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infirm
used in King Lear

5 uses
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Definition
lacking physical strength or vitality — especially due to illness or age
  • 'tis the infirmity of his age: yet he hath ever but slenderly known himself.
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — A Room of State in King Lear's Palace (95% in)
  • Will you, with those infirmities she owes, Unfriended, new-adopted to our hate, Dower'd with our curse, and stranger'd with our oath, Take her, or leave her?
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — A Room of State in King Lear's Palace (66% in)
  • The best and soundest of his time hath been but rash; then must we look to receive from his age, not alone the imperfections of long-ingraffed condition, but therewithal the unruly waywardness that infirm and choleric years bring with them.
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — A Room of State in King Lear's Palace (97% in)
  • —Tell the hot duke that— No, but not yet: may be he is not well: Infirmity doth still neglect all office Whereto our health is bound: we are not ourselves When nature, being oppress'd, commands the mind To suffer with the body: I'll forbear; And am fallen out with my more headier will, To take the indispos'd and sickly fit For the sound man.
    2.4 — Act 2 Scene 4 — Before Gloster's Castle; Kent in the stocks (31% in)
  • Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters: I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness; I never gave you kingdom, call'd you children; You owe me no subscription: then let fall Your horrible pleasure; here I stand, your slave, A poor, infirm, weak, and despis'd old man:— But yet I call you servile ministers, That will with two pernicious daughters join Your high-engender'd battles 'gainst a head So old and white as this!
    3.2 — Act 3 Scene 2 — Another part of the heath. Storm continues (24% in)

There are no more uses of "infirm" in King Lear.

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