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disdain
used in King Lear

2 uses
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Definition
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
  • —taught me to shift Into a madman's rags; to assume a semblance That very dogs disdain'd; and in this habit Met I my father with his bleeding rings, Their precious stones new lost; became his guide, Led him, begg'd for him, sav'd him from despair; Never,—O fault!
    5.2 — Act 5 Scene 2 — A field between the two Camps (59% in)
  • In wisdom I should ask thy name; But since thy outside looks so fair and warlike, And that thy tongue some say of breeding breathes, What safe and nicely I might well delay By rule of knighthood, I disdain and spurn: Back do I toss those treasons to thy head; With the hell-hated lie o'erwhelm thy heart; Which,—for they yet glance by and scarcely bruise,— This sword of mine shall give them instant way, Where they shall rest for ever.
    5.2 — Act 5 Scene 2 — A field between the two Camps (46% in)

There are no more uses of "disdain" in King Lear.

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