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derive
used in Henry IV, Part 2

4 uses
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Definition
to get something from something else

(If the context doesn't otherwise indicate where something came from, it is generally from reasoning—especially deductive reasoning.)
  • How is this derived?
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — Warkworth. Before the castle (26% in)
  • But now the bishop Turns insurrection to religion: Supposed sincere and holy in his thoughts, He 's follow'd both with body and with mind; And doth enlarge his rising with the blood Of fair King Richard, scraped from Pomfret stones; Derives from heaven his quarrel and his cause; Tells them he doth bestride a bleeding land, Gasping for life under great Bolingbroke; And more and less do flock to follow him.
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — Warkworth. Before the castle (96% in)
  • Yea, but our valuation shall be such That every slight and false-derived cause, Yea, every idle, nice and wanton reason Shall to the king taste of this action; That, were our royal faiths martyrs in love, We shall be winnow'd with so rough a wind That even our corn shall seem as light as chaff And good from bad find no partition.
    4.1 — Act 4 Scene 1 — Yorkshire. Gaultree Forest (83% in)
  • Thy due from me Is tears and heavy sorrows of the blood, Which nature, love, and filial tenderness, Shall, O dear father, pay thee plenteously: My due from thee is this imperial crown, Which, as immediate from thy place and blood, Derives itself to me.
    4.5 — Act 4 Scene 5 — Another chamber (19% in)

There are no more uses of "derive" in Henry IV, Part 2.

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