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glutton
used in Henry IV, Part 2

4 uses
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Definition
someone who consumes more than they should — especially eating and drinking too much

The expression:  "a glutton for punishment" refers to someone who persist in some activity despite negative consequences (as though loving the punishment)

The expression: "a glutton for whatever" refers to people who like whatever a lot — such that "a glutton for sunshine" loves sunshine.
  • So, so, thou common dog, didst thou disgorge Thy glutton bosom of the royal Richard; And now thou wouldst eat thy dead vomit up, And howl'st to find it.
    1.3 — Act 1 Scene 3 — York. The Archbishop's palace (88% in)
  • Let him be damned, like the glutton! pray God his tongue be hotter!
    1.2 — Act 1 Scene 2 — London. A street (15% in)
  • I make them! gluttony and diseases make them; I make them not.
    2.4 — Act 2 Scene 4 — London. The Boar's-head Tavern in Eastcheap (11% in)
  • If the cook help to make the gluttony, you help to make the diseases, Doll: we catch of you, Doll, we catch of you; grant that, my poor virtue, grant that.
    2.4 — Act 2 Scene 4 — London. The Boar's-head Tavern in Eastcheap (12% in)

There are no more uses of "glutton" in Henry IV, Part 2.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia Article