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therefore
used in Romeo and Juliet

23 uses
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Definition
for that reason (what follows is so because of what was just said)
  • To move is to stir; and to be valiant is to stand: therefore, if thou art moved, thou runn'st away.
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — A public place (5% in)
  • True; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels, are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push Montague's men from the wall and thrust his maids to the wall.
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — A public place (7% in)
  • True; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels, are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push Montague's men from the wall and thrust his maids to the wall.
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — A public place (8% in)
  • Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone, He bears him like a portly gentleman; And, to say truth, Verona brags of him To be a virtuous and well-govern'd youth: I would not for the wealth of all the town Here in my house do him disparagement: Therefore be patient, take no note of him,— It is my will; the which if thou respect, Show a fair presence and put off these frowns, An ill-beseeming semblance for a feast.
    1.5 — Act 1 Scene 5 — A Hall in Capulet's House (44% in)
  • With love's light wings did I o'erperch these walls; For stony limits cannot hold love out: And what love can do, that dares love attempt; Therefore thy kinsmen are no let to me.
    2.2 — Act 2 Scene 2 — Capulet's Garden (35% in)
  • In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond; And therefore thou mayst think my 'haviour light: But trust me, gentleman, I'll prove more true Than those that have more cunning to be strange.
    2.2 — Act 2 Scene 2 — Capulet's Garden (50% in)
  • I should have been more strange, I must confess, But that thou overheard'st, ere I was 'ware, My true-love passion: therefore pardon me; And not impute this yielding to light love, Which the dark night hath so discovered.
    2.2 — Act 2 Scene 2 — Capulet's Garden (53% in)
  • — Young son, it argues a distemper'd head So soon to bid good morrow to thy bed: Care keeps his watch in every old man's eye, And where care lodges sleep will never lie; But where unbruised youth with unstuff'd brain Doth couch his limbs, there golden sleep doth reign: Therefore thy earliness doth me assure Thou art uprous'd with some distemperature; Or if not so, then here I hit it right,— Our Romeo hath not been in bed to-night.
    2.3 — Act 2 Scene 3 — Friar Lawrence's Cell (41% in)
  • —Pray you, sir, a word: and, as I told you, my young lady bid me enquire you out; what she bade me say I will keep to myself: but first let me tell ye, if ye should lead her into a fool's paradise, as they say, it were a very gross kind of behaviour, as they say: for the gentlewoman is young; and, therefore, if you should deal double with her, truly it were an ill thing to be offered to any gentlewoman, and very weak dealing.
    2.4 — Act 2 Scene 4 — A Street (77% in)
  • — O, she is lame! love's heralds should be thoughts, Which ten times faster glide than the sun's beams, Driving back shadows over lowering hills: Therefore do nimble-pinion'd doves draw love, And therefore hath the wind-swift Cupid wings.
    2.5 — Act 2 Scene 5 — Capulet's Garden (9% in)
  • — O, she is lame! love's heralds should be thoughts, Which ten times faster glide than the sun's beams, Driving back shadows over lowering hills: Therefore do nimble-pinion'd doves draw love, And therefore hath the wind-swift Cupid wings.
    2.5 — Act 2 Scene 5 — Capulet's Garden (10% in)
  • These violent delights have violent ends, And in their triumph die; like fire and powder, Which, as they kiss, consume: the sweetest honey Is loathsome in his own deliciousness, And in the taste confounds the appetite: Therefore love moderately: long love doth so; Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
    2.6 — Act 2 Scene 6 — Friar Lawrence's Cell (37% in)
  • Villain am I none; Therefore farewell; I see thou know'st me not.
    3.1 — Act 3 Scene 1 — A public Place (33% in)
  • Boy, this shall not excuse the injuries That thou hast done me; therefore turn and draw.
    3.1 — Act 3 Scene 1 — A public Place (34% in)
  • And for that offence Immediately we do exile him hence: I have an interest in your hate's proceeding, My blood for your rude brawls doth lie a-bleeding; But I'll amerce you with so strong a fine That you shall all repent the loss of mine: I will be deaf to pleading and excuses; Nor tears nor prayers shall purchase out abuses, Therefore use none: let Romeo hence in haste, Else, when he is found, that hour is his last.
    3.1 — Act 3 Scene 1 — A public Place (98% in)
  • We'll keep no great ado,—a friend or two; For, hark you, Tybalt being slain so late, It may be thought we held him carelessly, Being our kinsman, if we revel much: Therefore we'll have some half a dozen friends, And there an end.
    3.4 — Act 3 Scene 4 — A Room in Capulet's House (74% in)
  • Yond light is not daylight, I know it, I: It is some meteor that the sun exhales To be to thee this night a torch-bearer And light thee on the way to Mantua: Therefore stay yet, thou need'st not to be gone.
    3.5 — Act 3 Scene 5 — An open Gallery to Juliet's Chamber....Garden (7% in)
  • An if thou couldst, thou couldst not make him live; Therefore have done: some grief shows much of love; But much of grief shows still some want of wit.
    3.5 — Act 3 Scene 5 — An open Gallery to Juliet's Chamber....Garden (30% in)
  • Immoderately she weeps for Tybalt's death, And therefore have I little talk'd of love; For Venus smiles not in a house of tears.
    4.1 — Act 4 Scene 1 — Friar Lawrence's Cell (6% in)
  • God join'd my heart and Romeo's, thou our hands; And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo's seal'd, Shall be the label to another deed, Or my true heart with treacherous revolt Turn to another, this shall slay them both: Therefore, out of thy long-experienc'd time, Give me some present counsel; or, behold, 'Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife Shall play the umpire; arbitrating that Which the commission of thy years and art Could to no issue of true honour bring.
    4.1 — Act 4 Scene 1 — Friar Lawrence's Cell (50% in)
  • Marry, sir, 'tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers: therefore he that cannot lick his fingers goes not with me.
    4.2 — Act 4 Scene 2 — Hall in Capulet's House (18% in)
  • Why I descend into this bed of death Is partly to behold my lady's face, But chiefly to take thence from her dead finger A precious ring,—a ring that I must use In dear employment: therefore hence, be gone:— But if thou, jealous, dost return to pry In what I further shall intend to do, By heaven, I will tear thee joint by joint, And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs: The time and my intents are savage-wild; More fierce and more inexorable far Than empty tigers or the roaring...
    5.3 — Act 5 Scene 3 — A churchyard; in it a Monument.... (11% in)
  • I must indeed; and therefore came I hither.
    5.3 — Act 5 Scene 3 — A churchyard; in it a Monument.... (19% in)

There are no more uses of "therefore" in Romeo and Juliet.

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