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carrion
used in Romeo and Juliet

2 uses
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Definition
the dead and rotting body of an animal; or (more rarely) animals that eat such flesh
  •   Heaven is here,
      Where Juliet lives, and every cat, and dog
      And little mouse, every unworthy thing,
      Live here in heaven, and may look on her,
      But Romeo may not. More validity,
      More honourable state, more courtship lives
      In carrion flies than Romeo.
    3.3 — Act 3 Scene 3 — Friar Lawrence's cell (20% in)
carrion = the dead and rotting body of an animal
  • Out, you green-sickness carrion! Out, you baggage!
    3.5 — Act 3 Scene 5 — An open Gallery to Juliet's Chamber....Garden (65% in)
carrion = the dead and rotting body of an animal

(editor's note:  Green-sickness refers to a kind of anemia thought to affect girls in puberty and made them pale.)
There are no more uses of "carrion" in Romeo and Juliet.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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