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perplex
used in Sense and Sensibility

6 uses
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Definition
to confuse
  • "It is strange," replied Elinor, in a most painful perplexity, "that I should never have heard him even mention your name."
    Chapter 22 (51% in)
  • — She had seen enough of her pride, her meanness, and her determined prejudice against herself, to comprehend all the difficulties that must have perplexed the engagement, and retarded the marriage, of Edward and herself, had he been otherwise free;—and she had seen almost enough to be thankful for her OWN sake, that one greater obstacle preserved her from suffering under any other of Mrs. Ferrars's creation, preserved her from all dependence upon her caprice, or any solicitude for her...
    Chapter 35 (3% in)
  • Elinor had just been congratulating herself, in the midst of her perplexity, that however difficult it might be to express herself properly by letter, it was at least preferable to giving the information by word of mouth, when her visitor entered, to force her upon this greatest exertion of all.
    Chapter 40 (37% in)
  • He coloured, seemed perplexed, looked doubtingly, and, after some hesitation, said,— "Perhaps you mean—my brother—you mean Mrs.—Mrs. ROBERT Ferrars."
    Chapter 48 (77% in)
  • ...hurry away, and perhaps saw— or even heard, her emotion; for immediately afterwards he fell into a reverie, which no remarks, no inquiries, no affectionate address of Mrs. Dashwood could penetrate, and at last, without saying a word, quitted the room, and walked out towards the village—leaving the others in the greatest astonishment and perplexity on a change in his situation, so wonderful and so sudden;—a perplexity which they had no means of lessening but by their own conjectures.
    Chapter 48 (98% in)
  • ...hurry away, and perhaps saw— or even heard, her emotion; for immediately afterwards he fell into a reverie, which no remarks, no inquiries, no affectionate address of Mrs. Dashwood could penetrate, and at last, without saying a word, quitted the room, and walked out towards the village—leaving the others in the greatest astonishment and perplexity on a change in his situation, so wonderful and so sudden;—a perplexity which they had no means of lessening but by their own conjectures.
    Chapter 48 (99% in)

There are no more uses of "perplex" in Sense and Sensibility.

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