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inclined
used in Sense and Sensibility

26 uses
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1  —3 uses as in:
I'm inclined to
Definition
a tendency, mood, desire, or attitude that favors something; or making someone favor something
  • Edward seemed to have as great an inclination to walk out of the room again, as to advance farther into it.
    Chapter 35 (41% in)
inclination = tendency (attitude favoring)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I have not had so many opportunities of estimating the minuter propensities of his mind, his inclinations and tastes, as you have; but I have the highest opinion in the world of his goodness and sense.
    Chapter 4 (16% in)
  • Elinor, without observing the varying complexion of her sister, and the animated look which spoke no indifference to the plan, immediately gave a grateful but absolute denial for both, in which she believed herself to be speaking their united inclinations.
    Chapter 25 (7% in)

There are no more uses of "inclined" flagged with this meaning in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —23 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • And at any rate, she lost nothing by continuing the engagement, for she has proved that it fettered neither her inclination nor her actions.
    Chapter 49 (57% in)
  • But there are other points to be considered besides his inclination.
    Chapter 4 (49% in)
  • Mrs. Dashwood entered into all their feelings with a warmth which left her no inclination for checking this excessive display of them.
    Chapter 11 (27% in)
  • I have only to add, my dear Willoughby, that at Barton cottage you will always be welcome; for I will not press you to return here immediately, because you only can judge how far THAT might be pleasing to Mrs. Smith; and on this head I shall be no more disposed to question your judgment than to doubt your inclination.
    Chapter 15 (20% in)
  • "— "It was not inclination that he wanted, Elinor; I could plainly see THAT.
    Chapter 15 (38% in)
  • I hope my mother is now convinced that I have no more talents than inclination for a public life!
    Chapter 17 (14% in)
  • But how is your fame to be established? for famous you must be to satisfy all your family; and with no inclination for expense, no affection for strangers, no profession, and no assurance, you may find it a difficult matter.
    Chapter 17 (16% in)
  • The shortness of his visit, the steadiness of his purpose in leaving them, originated in the same fettered inclination, the same inevitable necessity of temporizing with his mother.
    Chapter 19 (12% in)
  • But I had no inclination for the law, even in this less abstruse study of it, which my family approved.
    Chapter 19 (24% in)
  • Elinor was not inclined, after a little observation, to give him credit for being so genuinely and unaffectedly ill-natured or ill-bred as he wished to appear.
    Chapter 20 (33% in)
  • I am rather of a jealous temper too by nature, and from our different situations in life, from his being so much more in the world than me, and our continual separation, I was enough inclined for suspicion, to have found out the truth in an instant, if there had been the slightest alteration in his behaviour to me when we met, or any lowness of spirits that I could not account for, or if he had talked more of one lady than another, or seemed in any respect less happy at Longstaple...
    Chapter 24 (29% in)
  • But Mrs. Ferrars is a very headstrong proud woman, and in her first fit of anger upon hearing it, would very likely secure every thing to Robert, and the idea of that, for Edward's sake, frightens away all my inclination for hasty measures."
    Chapter 24 (40% in)
  • She was married—married against her inclination to my brother.
    Chapter 31 (43% in)
  • The dinner was a grand one, the servants were numerous, and every thing bespoke the Mistress's inclination for show, and the Master's ability to support it.
    Chapter 34 (53% in)
  • But so little were they, anymore than the others, inclined to oblige her, that if Sir John dined from home, she might spend a whole day without hearing any other raillery on the subject, than what she was kind enough to bestow on herself.
    Chapter 36 (17% in)
  • —This was an obligation, however, which not only opposed her own inclination, but which had not the assistance of any encouragement from her companions.
    Chapter 41 (11% in)
  • The consequence was, that Elinor set out by herself to pay a visit, for which no one could really have less inclination, and to run the risk of a tete-a-tete with a woman, whom neither of the others had so much reason to dislike.
    Chapter 41 (16% in)
  • ...a book in her hand, which she was unable to read, or in lying, weary and languid, on a sofa, did not speak much in favour of her amendment; and when, at last, she went early to bed, more and more indisposed, Colonel Brandon was only astonished at her sister's composure, who, though attending and nursing her the whole day, against Marianne's inclination, and forcing proper medicines on her at night, trusted, like Marianne, to the certainty and efficacy of sleep, and felt no real alarm.
    Chapter 43 (3% in)
  • Mrs. Jennings, who had been inclined from the first to think Marianne's complaint more serious than Elinor, now looked very grave on Mr. Harris's report, and confirming Charlotte's fears and caution, urged the necessity of her immediate removal with her infant; and Mr. Palmer, though treating their apprehensions as idle, found the anxiety and importunity of his wife too great to be withstood.
    Chapter 43 (7% in)
  • My affection for Marianne, my thorough conviction of her attachment to me—it was all insufficient to outweigh that dread of poverty, or get the better of those false ideas of the necessity of riches, which I was naturally inclined to feel, and expensive society had increased.
    Chapter 44 (41% in)
  • Elinor was half inclined to ask her reason for thinking so, because satisfied that none founded on an impartial consideration of their age, characters, or feelings, could be given;—but her mother must always be carried away by her imagination on any interesting subject, and therefore instead of an inquiry, she passed it off with a smile.
    Chapter 45 (52% in)
  • "It was a foolish, idle inclination on my side," said he, "the consequence of ignorance of the world— and want of employment.
    Chapter 49 (9% in)
  • ...of a nobleman with thirty thousand pounds, while Miss Dashwood was only the daughter of a private gentleman with no more than THREE; but when she found that, though perfectly admitting the truth of her representation, he was by no means inclined to be guided by it, she judged it wisest, from the experience of the past, to submit—and therefore, after such an ungracious delay as she owed to her own dignity, and as served to prevent every suspicion of good-will, she issued her decree...
    Chapter 50 (11% in)

There are no more uses of "inclined" in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®