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conjecture
used in Sense and Sensibility

16 uses
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Definition
a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence; or the act of forming of such a conclusion or opinion
  • In short, I could learn nothing but that she was gone; all the rest, for eight long months, was left to conjecture.
    Chapter 31 (77% in)
conjecture = conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence
  • She knew that what Marianne and her mother conjectured one moment, they believed the next—that with them, to wish was to hope, and to hope was to expect.
    Chapter 4 (37% in)
  • I once knew a lady who in temper and mind greatly resembled your sister, who thought and judged like her, but who from an inforced change—from a series of unfortunate circumstances"— Here he stopt suddenly; appeared to think that he had said too much, and by his countenance gave rise to conjectures, which might not otherwise have entered Elinor's head.
    Chapter 11 (93% in)
  • Marianne felt for her most sincerely; but she did more harm than good to the cause, by turning very red and saying in an angry manner to Margaret, "Remember that whatever your conjectures may be, you have no right to repeat them."
    Chapter 12 (71% in)
  • "I never had any conjectures about it," replied Margaret; "it was you who told me of it yourself."
    Chapter 12 (72% in)
  • Her opinion varying with every fresh conjecture, and all seeming equally probable as they arose.
    Chapter 14 (21% in)
  • On their return from the park they found Willoughby's curricle and servant in waiting at the cottage, and Mrs. Dashwood was convinced that her conjecture had been just.
    Chapter 15 (4% in)
  • Elinor could not suppose that Sir John would be more nice in proclaiming his suspicions of her regard for Edward, than he had been with respect to Marianne; indeed it was rather his favourite joke of the two, as being somewhat newer and more conjectural; and since Edward's visit, they had never dined together without his drinking to her best affections with so much significancy and so many nods and winks, as to excite general attention.
    Chapter 21 (87% in)
  • Marianne lifted up her eyes in astonishment, and Elinor conjectured that she might as well have held her tongue.
    Chapter 25 (83% in)
  • "And now," silently conjectured Elinor, "she will write to Combe by this day's post."
    Chapter 27 (10% in)
  • The event proved her conjecture right, though it was founded on injustice and error; for Colonel Brandon DID come in; and Elinor, who was convinced that solicitude for Marianne brought him thither, and who saw THAT solicitude in his disturbed and melancholy look, and in his anxious though brief inquiry after her, could not forgive her sister for esteeming him so lightly.
    Chapter 31 (28% in)
  • Had both the children been there, the affair might have been determined too easily by measuring them at once; but as Harry only was present, it was all conjectural assertion on both sides; and every body had a right to be equally positive in their opinion, and to repeat it over and over again as often as they liked.
    Chapter 34 (62% in)
  • "Really," said Elinor, "I know so little of these kind of forms, that I can hardly even conjecture as to the time, or the preparation necessary; but I suppose two or three months will complete his ordination."
    Chapter 40 (84% in)
  • His emotion on entering the room, in seeing her altered looks, and in receiving the pale hand which she immediately held out to him, was such, as, in Elinor's conjecture, must arise from something more than his affection for Marianne, or the consciousness of its being known to others; and she soon discovered in his melancholy eye and varying complexion as he looked at her sister, the probable recurrence of many past scenes of misery to his mind, brought back by that resemblance between...
    Chapter 46 (4% in)
  • Elinor, dreading her being tired, led her towards home; and till they reached the door of the cottage, easily conjecturing what her curiosity must be though no question was suffered to speak it, talked of nothing but Willoughby, and their conversation together; and was carefully minute in every particular of speech and look, where minuteness could be safely indulged.
    Chapter 46 (96% in)
  • ...hurry away, and perhaps saw— or even heard, her emotion; for immediately afterwards he fell into a reverie, which no remarks, no inquiries, no affectionate address of Mrs. Dashwood could penetrate, and at last, without saying a word, quitted the room, and walked out towards the village—leaving the others in the greatest astonishment and perplexity on a change in his situation, so wonderful and so sudden;—a perplexity which they had no means of lessening but by their own conjectures.
    Chapter 48 (**% in)

There are no more uses of "conjecture" in Sense and Sensibility.

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