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precise
used in Jane Eyre

18 uses
  • All my confidence is bestowed on him, all his confidence is devoted to me; we are precisely suited in character — perfect concord is the result.
    Chapter 38 — Conclusion (54% in)
  • Again I reflected: I scarcely knew what school was: Bessie sometimes spoke of it as a place where young ladies sat in the stocks, wore backboards, and were expected to be exceedingly genteel and precise: John Reed hated his school, and abused his master; but John Reed's tastes were no rule for mine, and if Bessie's accounts of school-discipline (gathered from the young ladies of a family where she had lived before coming to Gateshead) were somewhat appalling, her details of certain...
    Chapter 3 (81% in)
  • I was still looking at them, and also at intervals examining the teachers — none of whom precisely pleased me; for the stout one was a little coarse, the dark one not a little fierce, the foreigner harsh and grotesque, and Miss Miller, poor thing! looked purple, weather— beaten, and over-worked — when, as my eye wandered from face to face, the whole school rose simultaneously, as if moved by a common spring.
    Chapter 5 (56% in)
  • I cannot precisely define what they expected, but it was something pleasant: not perhaps that day or that month, but at an indefinite future period.
    Chapter 11 (35% in)
  • Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags.
    Chapter 12 (18% in)
  • Old Mr. Rochester and Mr. Rowland combined to bring Mr. Edward into what he considered a painful position, for the sake of making his fortune: what the precise nature of that position was I never clearly knew, but his spirit could not brook what he had to suffer in it.
    Chapter 13 (96% in)
  • Meantime, I am glad that you are the only person, besides myself, acquainted with the precise details of to-night's incident.
    Chapter 15 (90% in)
  • His manner was polite; his accent, in speaking, struck me as being somewhat unusual, — not precisely foreign, but still not altogether English: his age might be about Mr. Rochester's, — between thirty and forty; his complexion was singularly sallow: otherwise he was a fine-looking man, at first sight especially.
    Chapter 18 (62% in)
  • Yes; just so, in YOUR circumstances: but find me another precisely placed as you are.
    Chapter 19 (14% in)
  • Precisely: I see you do.
    Chapter 20 (80% in)
  • Then I went on to describe to her the gay company that had lately been staying at the house; and to these details Bessie listened with interest: they were precisely of the kind she relished.
    Chapter 21 (34% in)
  • Being pushed unceremoniously to one side — which was precisely what I wished — he usurped my place, and proceeded to accompany himself: for he could play as well as sing.
    Chapter 24 (84% in)
  • I acted precisely on this suggestion.
    Chapter 27 (48% in)
  • Mrs. Fairfax may indeed have suspected something, but she could have gained no precise knowledge as to facts.
    Chapter 27 (50% in)
  • Precisely! and what do you wish to know now?
    Chapter 27 (55% in)
  • My task was a very hard one; but, as I was absolutely resolved — as my cousins saw at length that my mind was really and immutably fixed on making a just division of the property — as they must in their own hearts have felt the equity of the intention; and must, besides, have been innately conscious that in my place they would have done precisely what I wished to do — they yielded at length so far as to consent to put the affair to arbitration.
    Chapter 33 (99% in)
  • — to CLEAN DOWN Moor House from chamber to cellar; my next to rub it up with bees-wax, oil, and an indefinite number of cloths, till it glitters again; my third, to arrange every chair, table, bed, carpet, with mathematical precision; afterwards I shall go near to ruin you in coals and peat to keep up good fires in every room; and lastly, the two days preceding that on which your sisters are expected will be devoted by Hannah and me to such a beating of eggs, sorting of currants,...
    Chapter 34 (6% in)
  • He addressed me precisely in his ordinary manner, or what had, of late, been his ordinary manner — one scrupulously polite.
    Chapter 35 (60% in)

There are no more uses of "precise" in Jane Eyre.

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