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perish
used in Jane Eyre

6 uses
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Definition
to die — especially in an unnatural way

or:

to be destroyed or cease to exist
  • Before the long hour and a half of prayers and Bible-reading was over, I felt ready to perish with cold.
    Chapter 6 (3% in)
  • I looked, and had an acute pleasure in looking, — a precious yet poignant pleasure; pure gold, with a steely point of agony: a pleasure like what the thirst-perishing man might feel who knows the well to which he has crept is poisoned, yet stoops and drinks divine draughts nevertheless.
    Chapter 17 (66% in)
  • I know how soon youth would fade and bloom perish, if, in the cup of bliss offered, but one dreg of shame, or one flavour of remorse were detected; and I do not want sacrifice, sorrow, dissolution — such is not my taste.
    Chapter 19 (62% in)
  • Sure was I of His efficiency to save what He had made: convinced I grew that neither earth should perish, nor one of the souls it treasured.
    Chapter 28 (15% in)
  • "All men must die," said a voice quite close at hand; "but all are not condemned to meet a lingering and premature doom, such as yours would be if you perished here of want."
    Chapter 28 (87% in)
  • I slept two nights in the open air, and wandered about two days without crossing a threshold: but twice in that space of time did I taste food; and it was when brought by hunger, exhaustion, and despair almost to the last gasp, that you, Mr. Rivers, forbade me to perish of want at your door, and took me under the shelter of your roof.
    Chapter 29 (88% in)

There are no more uses of "perish" in Jane Eyre.

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