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torrent
used in Jane Eyre

7 uses
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Definition
an overwhelming amount — especially of quickly moving water
  • I was too tired even to dream; I only once awoke to hear the wind rave in furious gusts, and the rain fall in torrents, and to be sensible that Miss Miller had taken her place by my side.
    Chapter 5 (35% in)
  • That beck itself was then a torrent, turbid and curbless: it tore asunder the wood, and sent a raving sound through the air, often thickened with wild rain or whirling sleet; and for the forest on its banks, THAT showed only ranks of skeletons.
    Chapter 9 (9% in)
  • It was not without a certain wild pleasure I ran before the wind, delivering my trouble of mind to the measureless air-torrent thundering through space.
    Chapter 25 (12% in)
  • Self-abandoned, relaxed, and effortless, I seemed to have laid me down in the dried-up bed of a great river; I heard a flood loosened in remote mountains, and felt the torrent come: to rise I had no will, to flee I had no strength.
    Chapter 26 (96% in)
  • It was near: and as I had lifted no petition to Heaven to avert it — as I had neither joined my hands, nor bent my knees, nor moved my lips — it came: in full heavy swing the torrent poured over me.
    Chapter 26 (99% in)
  • I was tempted to cease struggling with him — to rush down the torrent of his will into the gulf of his existence, and there lose my own.
    Chapter 35 (80% in)
  • The housekeeper and her husband were both of that decent phlegmatic order of people, to whom one may at any time safely communicate a remarkable piece of news without incurring the danger of having one's ears pierced by some shrill ejaculation, and subsequently stunned by a torrent of wordy wonderment.
    Chapter 38 — Conclusion (6% in)

There are no more uses of "torrent" in Jane Eyre.

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