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assault
used in Moby Dick

10 uses
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Definition
to attack someone or something physically or verbally; or to threaten violence
  • That Himmalehan, salt-sea Mastodon, clothed with such portentousness of unconscious power, that his very panics are more to be dreaded than his most fearless and malicious assaults!
    Chapters 13-15 — Wheelbarrow; Nantucket; Chowder (60% in)
  • ...Floundered and dived, in play, in chace, in battle, Fishes of every colour, form, and kind; Which language cannot paint, and mariner Had never seen; from dread Leviathan To insect millions peopling every wave: Gather'd in shoals immense, like floating islands, Led by mysterious instincts through that waste And trackless region, though on every side Assaulted by voracious enemies, Whales, sharks, and monsters, arm'd in front or jaw, With swords, saws, spiral horns, or hooked fangs."
    Extracts (60% in)
  • Being once pursued by a whale which he had wounded, he parried the assault for some time with a lance; but the furious monster at length rushed on the boat; himself and comrades only being preserved by leaping into the water when they saw the onset was inevitable.
    Extracts (81% in)
  • ...famous fishery, each mate or headsman, like a Gothic Knight of old, is always accompanied by his boat-steerer or harpooneer, who in certain conjunctures provides him with a fresh lance, when the former one has been badly twisted, or elbowed in the assault; and moreover, as there generally subsists between the two, a close intimacy and friendliness; it is therefore but meet, that in this place we set down who the Pequod's harpooneers were, and to what headsman each of them belonged.
    Chapters 25-27 — Postscript; Knights and Squires; Knights and Squires (75% in)
  • But at length, such calamities did ensue in these assaults—not restricted to sprained wrists and ankles, broken limbs, or devouring amputations—but fatal to the last degree of fatality; those repeated disastrous repulses, all accumulating and piling their terrors upon Moby Dick; those things had gone far to shake the fortitude of many brave hunters, to whom the story of the White Whale had eventually come.
    Chapters 40-42 — Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (23% in)
  • Nor is it to be gainsaid, that in some of these instances it has been declared that the interval of time between the two assaults could not have exceeded very many days.
    Chapters 40-42 — Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (36% in)
  • Forced into familiarity, then, with such prodigies as these; and knowing that after repeated, intrepid assaults, the White Whale had escaped alive; it cannot be much matter of surprise that some whalemen should go still further in their superstitions; declaring Moby Dick not only ubiquitous, but immortal (for immortality is but ubiquity in time); that though groves of spears should be planted in his flanks, he would still swim away unharmed; or if indeed he should ever be made to spout...
    Chapters 40-42 — Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (37% in)
  • Nor was it his unwonted magnitude, nor his remarkable hue, nor yet his deformed lower jaw, that so much invested the whale with natural terror, as that unexampled, intelligent malignity which, according to specific accounts, he had over and over again evinced in his assaults.
    Chapters 40-42 — Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (40% in)
  • And still puffing at his pipe, Stubb cheered on his crew to the assault.
    Chapters 61-63 — Stubb Kills a Whale; The Dart; The Crotch (23% in)
  • But soon resuming his horizontal attitude, Moby Dick swam swiftly round and round the wrecked crew; sideways churning the water in his vengeful wake, as if lashing himself up to still another and more deadly assault.
    Chapters 133-135 — The Chase—First Day; The Chase—Second Day; The Chase—Third Day (19% in)

There are no more uses of "assault" in Moby Dick.

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