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trade winds
used in Moby Dick

3 uses
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Definition
any surface winds that blow along a regular course with relatively regularly — especially strong easterly winds that blow through the tropics and subtropics
  • The tranced ship indolently rolls; the drowsy trade winds blow; everything resolves you into languor.
    Chapters 34-36 — The Cabin-Table; The Mast-Head; The Qarter-Deck—Ahab and all (41% in)
  • Making so long a passage through such unfrequented waters, descrying no ships, and ere long, sideways impelled by unvarying trade winds, over waves monotonously mild; all these seemed the strange calm things preluding some riotous and desperate scene.
    Chapters 124-126 — The Needle; The Log and Line; The Life-Buoy (65% in)
  • These warm Trade Winds, at least, that in the clear heavens blow straight on, in strong and steadfast, vigorous mildness; and veer not from their mark, however the baser currents of the sea may turn and tack, and mightiest Mississippies of the land swift and swerve about, uncertain where to go at last.
    Chapters 133-135 — The Chase—First Day; The Chase—Second Day; The Chase—Third Day (65% in)

There are no more uses of "trade winds" in Moby Dick.

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