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subdue
used in Moby Dick

4 uses
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1  —1 use
verb as in: subdued the opposition
Definition
to control, prevent, or make less intense — sometimes through force
The exact meaning of subdue depends upon its context. For example:
  • "subdued a nation" — defeated militarily and brought under control
  • "subdued the fever" — made it less intense or defeated it
  • "subdued her enthusiasm" — made it less intense
  • "subdued her fears" — made them less intense or overcame them
  • "subdued my emotions" — kept them under control
  • "subdued the crowd" — quieted or controlled it
  • ...ends of strange nations come up from the unknown nooks and ash-holes of the earth to man these floating outlaws of whalers; and the ships themselves often pick up such queer castaway creatures found tossing about the open sea on planks, bits of wreck, oars, whaleboats, canoes, blown-off Japanese junks, and what not; that Beelzebub himself might climb up the side and step down into the cabin to chat with the captain, and it would not create any unsubduable excitement in the forecastle.
    Chapters 49-51 — The Hyena; Ahab's Boat and Crew - Fedallah; The Spirit-Spout (47% in)

There are no more uses of "subdue" flagged with this meaning in Moby Dick.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —3 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • So still and subdued and yet somehow preluding was all the scene, and such an incantation of reverie lurked in the air, that each silent sailor seemed resolved into his own invisible self.
    Chapters 46-48 — Surmises; The Mat-Maker; The First Lowering (18% in)
  • ...Pip loved life, and all life's peaceable securities; so that the panic-striking business in which he had somehow unaccountably become entrapped, had most sadly blurred his brightness; though, as ere long will be seen, what was thus temporarily subdued in him, in the end was destined to be luridly illumined by strange wild fires, that fictitiously showed him off to ten times the natural lustre with which in his native Tolland County in Connecticut, he had once enlivened many a fiddler's...
    Chapters 91-93 — The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud; Ambergris; The Castaway (75% in)
  • Meantime while his whole attention was absorbed, the Parsee was kneeling beneath him on the ship's deck, and with face thrown up like Ahab's, was eyeing the same sun with him; only the lids of his eyes half hooded their orbs, and his wild face was subdued to an earthly passionlessness.
    Chapters 118-120 — The Quadrant; The Candles; The Deck (8% in)

There are no more uses of "subdue" in Moby Dick.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®