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Monsieur
used in Moby Dick

9 uses
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Definition
French equivalent to the English Mr.

or:

French equivalent to saying sir in English (a polite way to address a male)
  • "He says, Monsieur, that he's very happy to have been of any service to us."
    Chapters 91-93 — The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud; Ambergris; The Castaway (38% in)
  • "He says, Monsieur," said the Guernsey-man, in French, turning to his captain, "that only yesterday his ship spoke a vessel, whose captain and chief-mate, with six sailors, had all died of a fever caught from a blasted whale they had brought alongside."
    Chapters 91-93 — The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud; Ambergris; The Castaway (34% in)
  • He vows and declares, Monsieur, that the other whale, the dried one, is far more deadly than the blasted one; in fine, Monsieur, he conjures us, as we value our lives, to cut loose from these fish.
    Chapters 91-93 — The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud; Ambergris; The Castaway (36% in)
  • He vows and declares, Monsieur, that the other whale, the dried one, is far more deadly than the blasted one; in fine, Monsieur, he conjures us, as we value our lives, to cut loose from these fish.
    Chapters 91-93 — The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud; Ambergris; The Castaway (36% in)
  • "He says, Monsieur, that his principles won't admit of his drinking; but that if Monsieur wants to live another day to drink, then Monsieur had best drop all four boats, and pull the ship away from these whales, for it's so calm they won't drift."
    Chapters 91-93 — The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud; Ambergris; The Castaway (40% in)
  • "He says, Monsieur, that his principles won't admit of his drinking; but that if Monsieur wants to live another day to drink, then Monsieur had best drop all four boats, and pull the ship away from these whales, for it's so calm they won't drift."
    Chapters 91-93 — The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud; Ambergris; The Castaway (40% in)
  • "He says, Monsieur, that his principles won't admit of his drinking; but that if Monsieur wants to live another day to drink, then Monsieur had best drop all four boats, and pull the ship away from these whales, for it's so calm they won't drift."
    Chapters 91-93 — The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud; Ambergris; The Castaway (40% in)
  • Pass round the decanters; glad to see ye; fill up, monsieurs!
    Chapters 127-129 — The Deck; The Pequod meets the Rachel; The Cabin—Ahab and Pip (96% in)
  • Monsieurs, have ye seen one Pip?
    Chapters 127-129 — The Deck; The Pequod meets the Rachel; The Cabin—Ahab and Pip (96% in)

There are no more uses of "Monsieur" in Moby Dick.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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