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hideous
used in Moby Dick

14 uses
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Definition
extremely ugly, offensive, and/or frightening
  • Savage though he was, and hideously marred about the face—at least to my taste—his countenance yet had a something in it which was by no means disagreeable.
    Chapters 10-12 — A Bosom Friend; Nightgown; Biographical (7% in)
  • But now when the boatswain calls all hands to lighten her; when boxes, bales, and jars are clattering overboard; when the wind is shrieking, and the men are yelling, and every plank thunders with trampling feet right over Jonah's head; in all this raging tumult, Jonah sleeps his hideous sleep.
    Chapters 7-9 — The Chapel; The Pulpit; The Sermon (71% in)
  • Spurn the idol Bell, and the hideous dragon; turn from the wrath to come; mind thine eye, I say; oh! goodness gracious! steer clear of the fiery pit!
    Chapters 16-18 — The Ship; The Ramadan; His Mark (96% in)
  • * *With reference to the Polar bear, it may possibly be urged by him who would fain go still deeper into this matter, that it is not the whiteness, separately regarded, which heightens the intolerable hideousness of that brute; for, analysed, that heightened hideousness, it might be said, only rises from the circumstance, that the irresponsible ferociousness of the creature stands invested in the fleece of celestial innocence and love; and hence, by bringing together two such opposite...
    Chapters 40-42 — Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (68% in)
  • ...to the Polar bear, it may possibly be urged by him who would fain go still deeper into this matter, that it is not the whiteness, separately regarded, which heightens the intolerable hideousness of that brute; for, analysed, that heightened hideousness, it might be said, only rises from the circumstance, that the irresponsible ferociousness of the creature stands invested in the fleece of celestial innocence and love; and hence, by bringing together two such opposite emotions in our...
    Chapters 40-42 — Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (68% in)
  • The Albino is as well made as other men—has no substantive deformity—and yet this mere aspect of all-pervading whiteness makes him more strangely hideous than the ugliest abortion.
    Chapters 40-42 — Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (79% in)
  • Yet where is the mariner who will tell thee, "Sir, it was not so much the fear of striking hidden rocks, as the fear of that hideous whiteness that so stirred me?"
    Chapters 40-42 — Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (91% in)
  • So ignorant are most landsmen of some of the plainest and most palpable wonders of the world, that without some hints touching the plain facts, historical and otherwise, of the fishery, they might scout at Moby Dick as a monstrous fable, or still worse and more detestable, a hideous and intolerable allegory.
    Chapters 43-45 — Hark!; The Chart; The Affidavit (59% in)
  • For hours and hours from the almost stationary ship that hideous sight is seen.
    Chapters 67-69 — Cutting In; The Blanket; The Funeral (87% in)
  • Nevertheless, Leviathan is of so mighty a magnitude, all his proportions are so stately, that the same deficiency which in the sculptured Jove were hideous, in him is no blemish at all.
    Chapters 79-81 — The Prairie; The Nut; The Pequod Meets the Virgin (5% in)
  • But Death plucked down some virtuous elder brother, on whose whistling daily toil solely hung the responsibilities of some other family, and left the worse than useless old man standing, till the hideous rot of life should make him easier to harvest.
    Chapters 112-114 — The Blacksmith; The Forge; The Gilder (23% in)
  • Say he were pinioned even; knotted all over with ropes and hawsers; chained down to ring-bolts on this cabin floor; he would be more hideous than a caged tiger, then.
    Chapters 121-123 — Midnight, on the Forecastle; Midnight, Aloft; The Musket (84% in)
  • A pale, death-glimmer lit up Fedallah's sunken eyes; a hideous motion gnawed his mouth.
    Chapters 133-135 — The Chase—First Day; The Chase—Second Day; The Chase—Third Day (6% in)
  • And thus, through the serene tranquillities of the tropical sea, among waves whose hand-clappings were suspended by exceeding rapture, Moby Dick moved on, still withholding from sight the full terrors of his submerged trunk, entirely hiding the wrenched hideousness of his jaw.
    Chapters 133-135 — The Chase—First Day; The Chase—Second Day; The Chase—Third Day (10% in)

There are no more uses of "hideous" in Moby Dick.

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