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grapple
used in Moby Dick

3 uses
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Definition
to struggle:

typically a mental struggle — as in coming to terms with something

more rarely a physical struggle — as in hand-to-hand combat or moving something heavy or awkward
  • His greatest admirer could not have cordially justified his bringing his harpoon into breakfast with him, and using it there without ceremony; reaching over the table with it, to the imminent jeopardy of many heads, and grappling the beefsteaks towards him.
    Chapters 4-6 -- The Counter-Pane; Breakfast; The Street (70% in)
  • Hiding his canoe, still afloat, among these thickets, with its prow seaward, he sat down in the stern, paddle low in hand; and when the ship was gliding by, like a flash he darted out; gained her side; with one backward dash of his foot capsized and sank his canoe; climbed up the chains; and throwing himself at full length upon the deck, grappled a ring-bolt there, and swore not to let it go, though hacked in pieces.
    Chapters 10-12 -- A Bosom Friend; Nightgown; Biographical (81% in)
  • Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee.
    Chapters 133-135 -- The Chase--First Day; The Chase--Second Day; The Chase--Third Day (96% in)

There are no more uses of "grapple" in Moby Dick.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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