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repose
used in Moby Dick

14 uses
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Definition
to rest or lie
  • It is customary to have two harpoons reposing in the crotch, respectively called the first and second irons.
    Chapters 61-63 -- Stubb Kills a Whale; The Dart; The Crotch (87% in)
  • Some considering touch of humanity was in him; for at times like these, he usually abstained from patrolling the quarter-deck; because to his wearied mates, seeking repose within six inches of his ivory heel, such would have been the reverberating crack and din of that bony step, that their dreams would have been on the crunching teeth of sharks.
    Chapters 28-30 -- Ahab; (Enter Ahab; to Him, Stubb); The Pipe (64% in)
  • As for the white shark, the white gliding ghostliness of repose in that creature, when beheld in his ordinary moods, strangely tallies with the same quality in the Polar quadruped.
    Chapters 40-42 -- Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (69% in)
  • It was in the midst of this repose, that Archy, one of the cordon, whose post was near the after-hatches, whispered to his neighbor, a Cholo, the words above.
    Chapters 43-45 -- Hark!; The Chart; The Affidavit (2% in)
  • Even when wearied nature seemed demanding repose he would not seek that repose in his hammock.
    Chapters 49-51 -- The Hyena; Ahab's Boat and Crew - Fedallah; The Spirit-Spout (95% in)
  • Even when wearied nature seemed demanding repose he would not seek that repose in his hammock.
    Chapters 49-51 -- The Hyena; Ahab's Boat and Crew - Fedallah; The Spirit-Spout (95% in)
  • The effect is very fine, when considered with reference to its presenting the hardy fishermen under one of their few aspects of oriental repose.
    Chapters 55-57 -- Monstrous Pictures of Whales; Less Erroneous Pictures of Whales; Whales in Paint…. (74% in)
  • Whether the flitting attendance of the one still and solitary jet had gradually worked upon Ahab, so that he was now prepared to connect the ideas of mildness and repose with the first sight of the particular whale he pursued; however this was, or whether his eagerness betrayed him; whichever way it might have been, no sooner did he distinctly perceive the white mass, than with a quick intensity he instantly gave orders for lowering.
    Chapters 58-60 -- Brit; Squid; The Line (40% in)
  • ...precedes and prophesies of the storm, is perhaps more awful than the storm itself; for, indeed, the calm is but the wrapper and envelope of the storm; and contains it in itself, as the seemingly harmless rifle holds the fatal powder, and the ball, and the explosion; so the graceful repose of the line, as it silently serpentines about the oarsmen before being brought into actual play—this is a thing which carries more of true terror than any other aspect of this dangerous affair.
    Chapters 58-60 -- Brit; Squid; The Line (97% in)
  • In the repose of the pasture, the curled brow of the bull has a touch of the grand in it.
    Chapters 79-81 -- The Prairie; The Nut; The Pequod Meets the Virgin (7% in)
  • At the high end the skull forms a crater to bed that part of the mass; while under the long floor of this crater—in another cavity seldom exceeding ten inches in length and as many in depth—reposes the mere handful of this monster's brain.
    Chapters 79-81 -- The Prairie; The Nut; The Pequod Meets the Virgin (18% in)
  • Owing to the density of the crowd of reposing whales, more immediately surrounding the embayed axis of the herd, no possible chance of escape was at present afforded us.
    Chapters 85-87 -- The Fountain; The Tail; The Grand Armada (80% in)
  • There is no steady unretracing progress in this life; we do not advance through fixed gradations, and at the last one pause:—through infancy's unconscious spell, boyhood's thoughtless faith, adolescence' doubt (the common doom), then scepticism, then disbelief, resting at last in manhood's pondering repose of If.
    Chapters 112-114 -- The Blacksmith; The Forge; The Gilder (94% in)
  • A gentle joyousness—a mighty mildness of repose in swiftness, invested the gliding whale.
    Chapters 133-135 -- The Chase--First Day; The Chase--Second Day; The Chase--Third Day (9% in)

There are no more uses of "repose" in Moby Dick.

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