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lurid
used in Moby Dick

3 uses
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Definition
shocking, as from disturbing details of a horrible story, or a color more vivid (bright or deep) than would be expected
  • For in his eyes I read some lurid woe would shrivel me up, had I it.
    Chapters 37-39 -- Sunset; Dusk; First Night-Watch (55% in)
  • Our captain has his birthmark; look yonder, boys, there's another in the sky—lurid-like, ye see, all else pitch black.
    Chapters 40-42 -- Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (13% in)
  • ...so that the panic-striking business in which he had somehow unaccountably become entrapped, had most sadly blurred his brightness; though, as ere long will be seen, what was thus temporarily subdued in him, in the end was destined to be luridly illumined by strange wild fires, that fictitiously showed him off to ten times the natural lustre with which in his native Tolland County in Connecticut, he had once enlivened many a fiddler's frolic on the green; and at melodious even-tide,...
    Chapters 91-93 -- The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud; Ambergris; The Castaway (75% in)

There are no more uses of "lurid" in Moby Dick.

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