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ignominious
used in Moby Dick

2 uses
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Definition
deserving or bringing disgrace or shame — typically in reference to behavior or character
  • But like Czar Peter content to toil in the shipyards of foreign cities, Queequeg disdained no seeming ignominy, if thereby he might happily gain the power of enlightening his untutored countrymen.
    Chapters 10-12 -- A Bosom Friend; Nightgown; Biographical (85% in)
  • Men may seem detestable as joint stock-companies and nations; knaves, fools, and murderers there may be; men may have mean and meagre faces; but man, in the ideal, is so noble and so sparkling, such a grand and glowing creature, that over any ignominious blemish in him all his fellows should run to throw their costliest robes.
    Chapters 25-27 -- Postscript; Knights and Squires; Knights and Squires (37% in)

There are no more uses of "ignominious" in Moby Dick.

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