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assume
used in To Kill a Mockingbird

2 meanings, 10 uses
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1  —9 uses as in:
I assume it's true
Definition
to accept something as true without proof
  • When Halloween came, I assumed that the whole family would be present to watch me perform, but I was disappointed.
    p. 339.5
assumed = accepted as true (without proof)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Mr. Radley walked to town at eleven-thirty every morning and came back promptly at twelve, sometimes carrying a brown paper bag that the neighborhood assumed contained the family groceries.
    p. 11.6
  • assumed = accepted as true (without proof)
  • What Jem did was something I'd do as a matter of course had I not been under Atticus's interdict, which I assumed included not fighting horrible old ladies.
    p. 137.1
  • assumed = accepted as true (without proof)
  • Atticus and Jem were well ahead of us, and I assumed that Atticus was giving him hell for not going home, but I was wrong.
    p. 207.8
  • assumed = accepted as true (without proof)
  • I could see nothing in Mayella's expression to justify Atticus's assumption that he had secured her wholehearted cooperation.
    p. 243.3
  • assumption = something accepted as true (without proof)

    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The witnesses for the state, with the exception of the sheriff of Maycomb County, have presented themselves to you gentlemen, to this court, in the cynical confidence that their testimony would not be doubted, confident that you gentlemen would go along with them on the assumption—the evil assumption that all Negroes lie, that all Negroes are basically immoral beings, that all Negro men are not to be trusted around our women, an assumption one associates with minds of their caliber.
    p. 273.4
  • assumption = something accepted as true (without proof)

    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • —the evil assumption that all Negroes lie,
    p. 273.4
  • assumption = something accepted as true (without proof)

    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • ...that all Negro men are not to be trusted around our women, an assumption one associates with minds of their caliber.
    p. 273.5
  • assumption = something accepted as true (without proof)

    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • I felt a slight pressure on my head, and assumed that Jem had grabbed that end of the ham.
    p. 348.1
assumed = accepted as true (without proof)
There are no more uses of "assume" flagged with this meaning in To Kill a Mockingbird.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —1 use as in:
She assumed a false identity
Definition
to take on (adopt, wear, strike a pose or appearance of) — often while pretending or disguising
  • Mrs. Merriweather was one of those childless adults who find it necessary to assume a different tone of voice when speaking to children.
    p. 310.5
assume = take on or adopt
There are no more uses of "assume" flagged with this meaning in To Kill a Mockingbird.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®