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oppress
used in The Great Gatsby

2 uses
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Definition
to make uncomfortable (weigh heavily on the senses or spirit)
  • Jordan and Tom and I got into the front seat of Gatsby's car, Tom pushed the unfamiliar gears tentatively, and we shot off into the oppressive heat, leaving them out of sight behind.
    p. 121.7
oppressive = uncomfortable

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • Perhaps his presence gave the evening its peculiar quality of oppressiveness — it stands out in my memory from Gatsby's other parties that summer. There were the same people, or at least the same sort of people, the same profusion of champagne, the same many-colored, many-keyed commotion, but I felt an unpleasantness in the air, a pervading harshness that hadn't been there before.
    p. 104.1
oppressiveness = discomfort

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
There are no more uses of "oppress" in The Great Gatsby.

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