toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

despair
used in The Great Gatsby

2 meanings, 3 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
1  —2 uses as in:
she felt despair
Definition
hopelessness; or distress (such as extreme worry or sadness from feeling powerless to change a bad situation)
  • He was worried now — there was a quality of nervous despair in Daisy's letters.
    p. 151.1
despair = hopelessness and distress
  • Myrtle raised her eyebrows in despair at the shiftlessness of the lower orders.
    p. 32.2
despair = hopelessness
There are no more uses of "despair" flagged with this meaning in The Great Gatsby.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —1 use as in:
she was the despair of the team
Definition
something that causes hopelessness or great distress
  • When he had gone half way he turned around and stared at the scene — his wife and Catherine scolding and consoling as they stumbled here and there among the crowded furniture with articles of aid, and the despairing figure on the couch, bleeding fluently, and trying to spread a copy of "Town Tattle." over the tapestry scenes of Versailles.
    p. 37.7
despairing = causing distress and loss of hope
There are no more uses of "despair" flagged with this meaning in The Great Gatsby.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®