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endure
used in Frankenstein

43 uses
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1  —2 uses as in:
endured the pain
Definition
to suffer through (or put up with something difficult or unpleasant)
  • ...the sorrows she had endured...
    Chapter 1 (40% in)
endured = suffered through
  • Yet I did not heed the bleakness of the weather; I was better fitted by my conformation for the endurance of cold than heat.
    Chapter 15 (54% in)

There are no more uses of "endure" flagged with this meaning in Frankenstein.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —41 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • But in the detail which he gave you of them he could not sum up the hours and months of misery which I endured wasting in impotent passions.
    Chapter 24 (91% in)
  • I accompanied the whale-fishers on several expeditions to the North Sea; I voluntarily endured cold, famine, thirst, and want of sleep; I often worked harder than the common sailors during the day and devoted my nights to the study of mathematics, the theory of medicine, and those branches of physical science from which a naval adventurer might derive the greatest practical advantage.
    Introductory Letters (14% in)
  • You may easily imagine that I was much gratified by the offered communication, yet I could not endure that he should renew his grief by a recital of his misfortunes.
    Introductory Letters (95% in)
  • Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room and continued a long time traversing my bed-chamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep.
    Chapter 5 (12% in)
  • At length lassitude succeeded to the tumult I had before endured, and I threw myself on the bed in my clothes, endeavouring to seek a few moments of forgetfulness.
    Chapter 5 (14% in)
  • I trembled excessively; I could not endure to think of, and far less to allude to, the occurrences of the preceding night.
    Chapter 5 (59% in)
  • This girl had always been the favourite of her father, but through a strange perversity, her mother could not endure her, and after the death of M. Moritz, treated her very ill.
    Chapter 6 (18% in)
  • I prophesied truly, and failed only in one single circumstance, that in all the misery I imagined and dreaded, I did not conceive the hundredth part of the anguish I was destined to endure.
    Chapter 7 (40% in)
  • I had before experienced sensations of horror, and I have endeavoured to bestow upon them adequate expressions, but words cannot convey an idea of the heart-sickening despair that I then endured.
    Chapter 8 (53% in)
  • God raises my weakness and gives me courage to endure the worst.
    Chapter 8 (77% in)
  • Six years had passed since then: I was a wreck, but nought had changed in those savage and enduring scenes.
    Chapter 9 (74% in)
  • Exhaustion succeeded to the extreme fatigue both of body and of mind which I had endured.
    Chapter 9 (97% in)
  • Man's yesterday may ne'er be like his morrow; Nought may endure but mutability!
    Chapter 10 (33% in)
  • ...and the green banks interspersed with innumerable flowers, sweet to the scent and the eyes, stars of pale radiance among the moonlight woods; the sun became warmer, the nights clear and balmy; and my nocturnal rambles were an extreme pleasure to me, although they were considerably shortened by the late setting and early rising of the sun, for I never ventured abroad during daylight, fearful of meeting with the same treatment I had formerly endured in the first village which I entered.
    Chapter 13 (49% in)
  • Felix soon learned that the treacherous Turk, for whom he and his family endured such unheard-of oppression, on discovering that his deliverer was thus reduced to poverty and ruin, became a traitor to good feeling and honour and had quitted Italy with his daughter, insultingly sending Felix a pittance of money to aid him, as he said, in some plan of future maintenance.
    Chapter 14 (73% in)
  • He could have endured poverty, and while this distress had been the meed of his virtue, he gloried in it; but the ingratitude of the Turk and the loss of his beloved Safie were misfortunes more bitter and irreparable.
    Chapter 14 (77% in)
  • But this was a luxury of sensation that could not endure; I became fatigued with excess of bodily exertion and sank on the damp grass in the sick impotence of despair.
    Chapter 16 (7% in)
  • My travels were long and the sufferings I endured intense.
    Chapter 16 (46% in)
  • My daily vows rose for revenge—a deep and deadly revenge, such as would alone compensate for the outrages and anguish I had endured.
    Chapter 16 (70% in)
  • The labours I endured were no longer to be alleviated by the bright sun or gentle breezes of spring; all joy was but a mockery which insulted my desolate state and made me feel more painfully that I was not made for the enjoyment of pleasure.
    Chapter 16 (71% in)
  • I could only think of the bourne of my travels and the work which was to occupy me whilst they endured.
    Chapter 18 (61% in)
  • I have endured toil and misery; I left Switzerland with you; I crept along the shores of the Rhine, among its willow islands and over the summits of its hills.
    Chapter 20 (24% in)
  • I have endured incalculable fatigue, and cold, and hunger; do you dare destroy my hopes?
    Chapter 20 (25% in)
  • Almost spent, as I was, by fatigue and the dreadful suspense I endured for several hours, this sudden certainty of life rushed like a flood of warm joy to my heart, and tears gushed from my eyes.
    Chapter 20 (81% in)
  • The human frame could no longer support the agonies that I endured, and I was carried out of the room in strong convulsions.
    Chapter 21 (24% in)
  • As Mr. Kirwin said this, notwithstanding the agitation I endured on this retrospect of my sufferings, I also felt considerable surprise at the knowledge he seemed to possess concerning me.
    Chapter 21 (53% in)
  • The name of my unfortunate and murdered friend was an agitation too great to be endured in my weak state; I shed tears.
    Chapter 21 (67% in)
  • I have one secret, Elizabeth, a dreadful one; when revealed to you, it will chill your frame with horror, and then, far from being surprised at my misery, you will only wonder that I survive what I have endured.
    Chapter 22 (54% in)
  • The tranquillity which I now enjoyed did not endure.
    Chapter 22 (58% in)
  • If you knew what I have suffered and what I may yet endure, you would endeavour to let me taste the quiet and freedom from despair that this one day at least permits me to enjoy.
    Chapter 22 (90% in)
  • But the overflowing misery I now felt, and the excess of agitation that I endured rendered me incapable of any exertion.
    Chapter 23 (47% in)
  • I have traversed a vast portion of the earth and have endured all the hardships which travellers in deserts and barbarous countries are wont to meet.
    Chapter 24 (2% in)
  • Cold, want, and fatigue were the least pains which I was destined to endure; I was cursed by some devil and carried about with me my eternal hell; yet still a spirit of good followed and directed my steps and when I most murmured would suddenly extricate me from seemingly insurmountable difficulties.
    Chapter 24 (10% in)
  • Come on, my enemy; we have yet to wrestle for our lives, but many hard and miserable hours must you endure until that period shall arrive.
    Chapter 24 (17% in)
  • He had escaped me, and I must commence a destructive and almost endless journey across the mountainous ices of the ocean, amidst cold that few of the inhabitants could long endure and which I, the native of a genial and sunny climate, could not hope to survive.
    Chapter 24 (24% in)
  • I cannot guess how many days have passed since then, but I have endured misery which nothing but the eternal sentiment of a just retribution burning within my heart could have enabled me to support.
    Chapter 24 (26% in)
  • And do I dare to ask of you to undertake my pilgrimage, to endure the hardships that I have undergone?
    Chapter 24 (34% in)
  • And now, behold, with the first imagination of danger, or, if you will, the first mighty and terrific trial of your courage, you shrink away and are content to be handed down as men who had not strength enough to endure cold and peril; and so, poor souls, they were chilly and returned to their warm firesides.
    Chapter 24 (61% in)
  • Yet I fear such will be my fate; the men, unsupported by ideas of glory and honour, can never willingly continue to endure their present hardships.
    Chapter 24 (64% in)
  • My heart was fashioned to be susceptible of love and sympathy, and when wrenched by misery to vice and hatred, it did not endure the violence of the change without torture such as you cannot even imagine.
    Chapter 24 (83% in)
  • I am content to suffer alone while my sufferings shall endure; when I die, I am well satisfied that abhorrence and opprobrium should load my memory.
    Chapter 24 (89% in)

There are no more uses of "endure" in Frankenstein.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®