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fraudulent
used in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

21 uses
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Definition
intentional deception — usually for financial gain or ego
  • These uncles of yourn ain't no uncles at all; they're a couple of frauds—regular dead-beats.
    Chapter 28 (17% in)
frauds = people who deceive others
  • It didn't take me long to make up my mind that these liars warn't no kings nor dukes at all, but just low-down humbugs and frauds.
    Chapter 19 (97% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • If they warn't the beatenest lot, them two frauds, that ever I struck.
    Chapter 24 (96% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • So these two frauds said they'd go and fetch it up, and have everything square and above-board; and told me to come with a candle.
    Chapter 25 (38% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • And everybody crowded up with the tears in their eyes, and most shook the hands off of them frauds, saying all the time: "You DEAR good souls!"
    Chapter 25 (68% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • You're a fraud, that's what you are!
    Chapter 25 (85% in)
  • fraud = someone who deceives others
  • But it warn't no use; he stormed right along, and said any man that pretended to be an Englishman and couldn't imitate the lingo no better than what he did was a fraud and a liar.
    Chapter 25 (89% in)
  • fraud = someone who deceives others
  • I says to myself, shall I go to that doctor, private, and blow on these frauds?
    Chapter 26 (58% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • It injured the frauds some; but the old fool he bulled right along, spite of all the duke could say or do, and I tell you the duke was powerful uneasy.
    Chapter 27 (70% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • "Well," I says, "it's a rough gang, them two frauds, and I'm fixed so I got to travel with them a while longer, whether I want to or not—"
    Chapter 28 (23% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • I see how maybe I could get me and Jim rid of the frauds; get them jailed here, and then leave.
    Chapter 28 (26% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • The duke he never let on he suspicioned what was up, but just went a goo-gooing around, happy and satisfied, like a jug that's googling out buttermilk; and as for the king, he just gazed and gazed down sorrowful on them new-comers like it give him the stomach-ache in his very heart to think there could be such frauds and rascals in the world.
    Chapter 29 (4% in)
  • —and very convenient, too, for a fraud that's got to make signs, and ain't learnt how.
    Chapter 29 (10% in)
  • fraud = someone who deceives others
  • Preacher be hanged, he's a fraud and a liar.
    Chapter 29 (17% in)
  • fraud = someone who deceives others
  • The doctor says: "Neighbors, I don't know whether the new couple is frauds or not;"
    Chapter 29 (20% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • ...but if THESE two ain't frauds, I am an idiot, that's all.
    Chapter 29 (20% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • First, the doctor says: "I don't wish to be too hard on these two men, but I think they're frauds, and they may have complices that we don't know nothing about."
    Chapter 29 (24% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • If these men ain't frauds, they won't object to sending for that money and letting us keep it till they prove they're all right—ain't that so?
    Chapter 29 (25% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • Well, everybody WAS in a state of mind now, and they sings out: "The whole BILIN' of 'm 's frauds!"
    Chapter 29 (66% in)
  • So now the frauds reckoned they was out of danger, and they begun to work the villages again.
    Chapter 31 (2% in)
  • frauds = people who deceive others
  • They had the cheek, them frauds!
    Chapter 31 (70% in)
frauds = people who deceive others
There are no more uses of "fraudulent" in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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