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morose
used in Wuthering Heights

6 uses
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Definition
unhappy — often with a withdrawn personality
  • Mr. Heathcliff followed, his accidental merriment expiring quickly in his habitual moroseness.
    Chapter 2 (98% in)
  • He is a darkskinned gipsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman: that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure; and rather morose.
    Chapter 1 (51% in)
  • Then personal appearance sympathised with mental deterioration: he acquired a slouching gait and ignoble look; his naturally reserved disposition was exaggerated into an almost idiotic excess of unsociable moroseness; and he took a grim pleasure, apparently, in exciting the aversion rather than the esteem of his few acquaintance.
    Chapter 8 (52% in)
  • I shuddered to be near him, and thought on the servant's ill-bred moroseness as comparatively agreeable.
    Chapter 13 (61% in)
  • The pettishness that might be caressed into fondness, had yielded to a listless apathy; there was less of the peevish temper of a child which frets and teases on purpose to be soothed, and more of the self-absorbed moroseness of a confirmed invalid, repelling consolation, and ready to regard the good-humoured mirth of others as an insult.
    Chapter 26 (36% in)
  • Earnshaw sat, morose as usual, at the chimney corner, and my little mistress was beguiling an idle hour with drawing pictures on the window-panes, varying her amusement by smothered bursts of songs, and whispered ejaculations, and quick glances of annoyance and impatience in the direction of her cousin, who steadfastly smoked, and looked into the grate.
    Chapter 32 (67% in)

There are no more uses of "morose" in Wuthering Heights.

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