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Chasing Lincoln's Killer

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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accomplice
12 uses
With Booth dead, and his chief accomplices under arrest, awaiting trial, it was time to cash in.†
accomplices = people who assisted each other in a task
From page 182.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally accomplice means:
a person who joins with another in carrying out a plan — especially an unethical or illegal plan
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.73.9
Web Links
agitate
3 uses
If Booth's agitation about the riders worried Garrett, his flight into the woods with Herold frightened him even more.†
agitation = the act of stirring up (emotionally or physically); or a state of emotional unrest

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 162.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally agitate means:
to stir up or shake — emotionally (as when people are angered or upset) or physically (as when a washing machine cleans clothes)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 11, p.162.1
Web Links
approach
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
approached the city
As midnight approached on the night of April 14, Lewis Powell was in trouble.†
approached = got near
From page 71  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to get closer to (near in space, time, quantity, or quality)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library104 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.71
Web Links
chaos
4 uses
If someone did not take command of the situation soon, the house would be in chaos.†
chaos = a state of extreme confusion and disorder
From page 86.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library26 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.26.9
Web Links
conflict
2 uses
The conflict had begun long before over the right to own slaves and states' right to secede, that is, to leave the Union if they disagreed with the government.†
conflict = struggle or disagreement
From page i.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally conflict means:
a struggle or disagreement
in various senses, including:
  • a serious disagreement — as in "political conflict"
  • the tension from two opposing ideas or feelings — as in "I'm conflicted about where I should go to college."
  • a violent fight or war — as in "the Israeli-Palestinian conflict"
  • an idiom that refers to tension between responsibilities to different entities — "conflict of interest"
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library21 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useIntr., p.i.1
Web Links
controversial
1 use
Lincoln was transformed from a controversial and often unpopular war leader into a martyr and hero.†
controversial = tending to arouse strong disagreement
From page 138.5  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 9, p.138.5
Web Links
direct
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
directly above; or buy direct from
Hawk stood directly in Booth's escape path.†
directly = close
From page 43.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of direct means:
straight (exactly where stated); or without involvement of anything in between
The exact meaning of this sense of direct is subject to its context. For example:
  • "The road runs directly to Las Vegas." — straight (without varying from a straight line)
  • "It was a direct hit." — exact
  • "The plant is in direct sunlight." — unobstructed (without anything in between)
  • "She wants a direct meeting with him." — personal (without other people in between)
  • "She paid direct attention to what he was reading." — close
  • "a direct gaze" — straight, steady, or focused—not a brief glance taken while generally looking at other things; not a sideways look
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library62 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.11.9
Web Links
enable
2 uses
His knowledge of the river enabled him to calculate the best time to begin a trip across.†
enabled = made possible
From page 118.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally enable means:
to make possible
in various senses, including:
  • to give someone the ability, knowledge, or authority to do something — as in "The study will enable an informed discussion."
  • to activate a computer system for use — as in "You can enable the feature in the Settings Page."
  • to permit someone to repeat bad behavior, so they reinforce the bad pattern — as in "I don't want to enable her drug addiction."
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4, p.71.9
Web Links
genuine
1 use
He relished the company and the genuine hospitality, so different from Dr. Stuart's impolite, hostile reception.†
genuine = real
From page 158.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally genuine means:
real (as when a person is sincere or an object is not a replica or fake)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library24 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 11, p.158.3
Web Links
hospitable
2 uses
John had seen Booth's weapons and knew he would not hesitate to take revenge for his family's inhospitality and betrayal.†
inhospitality = unwelcoming

(Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in inhospitality means not and reverses the meaning of hospitality. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
From page 166.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally hospitable means:
welcoming
in various senses, including:
  • inclined to treat guests well — as in "She is good-natured and hospitable."
  • favorable to life and growth — as in "The climate is hospitable to roses."
  • open to new ideas or change — as in "The organization is hospitable to new ideas."
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11, p.163.9
Web Links
however
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
However, complications may...
Booth, however, refused to let Herold go.†
however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
From page 168.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of however means:
though (or another expression that connects contrasting ideas)

(Based on idea 1 we might not expect idea 2, but this is a way of saying that even though idea 1 exists, we still have idea 2.  Synonyms include in spite of that, , nevertheless, nonetheless, on the other hand, in contrastand but.)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library61 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1, p.24.6
Web Links
imply
1 use
Booth then threatened Atzerodt, implying that he might as well kill Johnson, because if he didn't, Booth would accuse him anyway and get him hanged.†
implying = suggesting (saying indirectly)
From page 27.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally imply means:
to suggest or say indirectly — possibly as a logical consequence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 1, p.27.8
Web Links
inevitable
2 uses
An encounter with soldiers was inevitable.†
inevitable = certain to happen
From page 154.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally inevitable means:
certain to happen (even if one tried to prevent it)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library23 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 6, p.101.9
Web Links
malicious
1 use
With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan — to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace, among ourselves, and with all nations."†
malice = the desire to hurt others or see them suffer
From page 2.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally malicious means:
wanting to see others suffer; or threatening evil
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useProl., p.2.6
Web Links
nevertheless
1 use
Nevertheless, unless Dr. Leale could stabilize him immediately, Lincoln would die within a few minutes.†
nevertheless = in spite of that (used to connect contrasting ideas)
From page 68.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally nevertheless means:
in spite of that (Used to connect contrasting ideas. Other synonyms could include words and phrases such as nonetheless, all the same, still,  and however.)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4, p.68.9
Web Links
notorious
4 uses
He enjoyed both fame and notoriety for a brief time.†
notoriety = fame for something bad
From page 186.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally notorious means:
well known for something bad
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12, p.186.9
Web Links
optimistic
1 use
Mary Todd Lincoln had noticed his recent optimism and now, during their afternoon carriage ride, she spoke to him about it.†
optimism = a tendency to expect and see the best in all things
From page 29.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally optimistic means:
expecting the best; or focusing on the good part of things
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1, p.29.8
Web Links
perish
1 use
It was far better to perish here.†
perish = die, be destroyed, or cease to exist
From page 171.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally perish means:
to die — especially in an unnatural way

or:

to be destroyed or cease to exist
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 11, p.171.9
Web Links
precede
3 uses
He also hoped to precede the rest of the cavalry and stake the first claim to the reward money.†
precede = to go or do before
From page 180.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1, p.13.7
Web Links
probe
4 uses
The doctors probed Lincoln's bullet wound with their bare, dirty fingers, sticking their pinkies inside Lincoln's brain.†
probed = investigated
From page 90.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally probe means:
to investigate; or an investigation

or:

any of various instrument used for investigation
instruments such as:
  • an instrument to measure electronic voltage
  • a surgical tool used for examination
  • an unmanned spacecraft used for exploration
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.68.3
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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