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Gifted Hands

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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cardiac
4 uses
One of the twins has had a cardiac arrest.†
cardiac arrest = when the heart stops beating

(editor's note:  Cardiac arrest is often used interchangeably with heart attack, but they have different technical meanings. Cardiac arrest usually results from an electrical disturbance in the heart and might be treated with a defibrillator or CPR.  A heart attack typically occurs when a blood clot blocks blood flowing to the heart.)
From page 207.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally cardiac means:
of or relating to the heart
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12, p.116.6
Web Links
contradict
2 uses
It hadn't taken me long to learn that those words contradicted his nice-guy image.†
contradicted = disagreed
From page 115.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally contradict means:
disagree
in various senses, including:
  • to say something is not true — as in "She contradicted his testimony."
  • to say something else is true when both can't be true — as in "I don't believe her. She contradicted herself as she told us what happened."
  • to be in conflict with — as in "Her assertions contradict accepted scientific principles."
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 8, p.75.3
Web Links
contrast
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
contrast their writing styles
By contrast, my father was six feet two, slender, and he often said, "You got to look sharp all the time, Bennie.†
by contrast = in a comparison that shows differences
From page 17.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
point to differences between; or compare to show differences
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2, p.17.1
Web Links
controversy
5 uses
Looking back, I believe that God had used the controversy over Denise to prepare me for the steps yet ahead.†
controversy = disagreement
From page 166.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally controversy means:
disagreement — especially regarding a public issue that arouses strong feelings
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 16, p.163.7
Web Links
convention
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
conventional behavior
I've tried all the conventional ways of finding a lob and found nothing.†
conventional = normal or typical
From page 82.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of convention means:
something regarded as normal or typical
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 5, p.48.7
Web Links
CT scan
10 uses
After I agreed, we did a CT scan, and I had to tell them that it appeared that he actually had three tumors.†
CT scan = a 3-dimensional X-ray image of part of the body using computerized tomography
From page 180.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally CT scan means:
a diagnostic medical test that uses X-rays to create a 3-dimensional image of part of the body
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12, p.120.7
Web Links
enable
7 uses
Naturally, these outlets also would enable me to advance rapidly through academic ranks.†
enable = make possible
From page 212.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally enable means:
to make possible
in various senses, including:
  • to give someone the ability, knowledge, or authority to do something — as in "The study will enable an informed discussion."
  • to activate a computer system for use — as in "You can enable the feature in the Settings Page."
  • to permit someone to repeat bad behavior, so they reinforce the bad pattern — as in "I don't want to enable her drug addiction."
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 14, p.139.4
Web Links
evaluate
5 uses
After we evaluated Denise, controversy broke out here at Hopkins over whether to do a hemispherectomy.†
evaluated = thought carefully and made a judgment about
From page 163.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally evaluate means:
to think carefully and make a judgment about something
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 11, p.106.7
Web Links
factor
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
It was the deciding factor.
Because of a number of significant factors involved, it was a miracle for Craig to get admitted.†
factors = things that affect a result or outcome
From page 177.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of factor means:
something that affects a result or outcome
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 18, p.177.6
Web Links
however
35 uses
1  —35 uses as in:
However, complications may...
However, if we choose to see the obstacles as hurdles, we can leap over them.†
however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
From page 224.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of however means:
though (or another expression that connects contrasting ideas)

(Based on idea 1 we might not expect idea 2, but this is a way of saying that even though idea 1 exists, we still have idea 2.  Synonyms include in spite of that, , nevertheless, nonetheless, on the other hand, in contrastand but.)
Word Statistics
Book35 uses
Library61 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4, p.30.9
Web Links
intellectual
5 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
intellectual stimulation
As an A student I could stand up intellectually with the best.†
intellectually = in a manner that relates to intelligence
From page 46.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of intellectual means:
related to intelligence — such as requiring, appealing to, or possessing intelligence
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.17.5
unquizzed meaning  —1 use
neurology
49 uses
We had gotten so busy at the hospital that we had to bring in another pediatric neurosurgeon.†
neurosurgeon = the branch of medicine that deals with the nervous system (including the brain)
From page 213.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book49 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12, p.119.3
Web Links
perceptive
1 use
All the students were bright; many of them extremely gifted and perceptive.†
perceptive = to be better at noticing or realizing things than most people
From page 70.1  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8, p.70.1
Web Links
persist
7 uses
Both symptoms persisted with alarming regularity.†
persisted = continued
From page 176.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally persist means:
to continue — often despite difficulty
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1, p.11.3
Web Links
phenomenon
2 uses
Naturally, with this kind of coverage untold thousands of the general public suddenly became involved in this surgical phenomenon.†
phenomenon = something that exists or happened — often of special interest
From page 205.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally phenomenon means:
something that exists or happened — especially something of special interest — sometimes someone or something that is extraordinary
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 15, p.150.6
Web Links
primarily
2 uses
More than being a teacher with interests limited primarily to music, Mr. Doakes encouraged my academic pursuits.†
primarily = mainly
From page 62.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally primarily means:
mainly (most importantly)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 7, p.62.2
Web Links
relevant
1 use
I also teach an adult Sabbath school class in which we discuss the issues of Christianity and their relevancy to our daily lives.†
relevancy = relating in a meaningful way to the issue in question
From page 213.3  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 21, p.213.3
Web Links
technique
8 uses
Using this technique, doctors could save a lot of time and energy instead of poking around inside the skull.†
technique = way of doing something
From page 102.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally technique means:
a way of doing something
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7, p.58.9
vivacious
2 uses
Within six weeks Bo-Bo was, once again, a normal 4-year-old girl—vivacious, bouncy, and cute.†
vivacious = having an engaging liveliness — when said of a person, typically said of a female
From page 169.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16, p.158.2
Web Links
waive
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
waive the right
And the University of Michigan waived the fees for in-state students who couldn't afford to pay.
waived = not enforce (not collect)
From page 68.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of waive means:
not enforce something to which one would otherwise be entitled
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8, p.68.5
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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