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Throne of Glass

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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adapt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
adapted to the new rules
The treachery of Lady Kaltain was disturbing, but had he known of Perrington's plan to reveal her character—even to prove how easily she'd adapt to their plans, and how strong her determination ran—he would have prevented it.†
adapt = change to fit a different situation; or make suitable
From page 388.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of adapt means:
changed to fit a different situation; or made suitable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 52, p.388.7
Web Links
agony
9 uses
The moans of agony amongst the clank of chains made a chorus as familiar as the dreary work songs they sang all day.†
agony = intense suffering
From page 4.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally agony means:
intense feelings of suffering — can be from mental or physical pain
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.4.2
Web Links
arrogant
9 uses
So, I highly suggest, Miss Sardothien, that you get your arrogance in check before you end up back in the mines.†
arrogance = having an excessive sense of superiority
From page 15.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.15.2
Web Links
beckon
4 uses
She could hear her voice, and the voice of another, and then saw a hand extended from within a stall to beckon Celaena inside.†
beckon = call (to come by using a hand gesture)
From page 244  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally beckon means:
to call — typically to ask or tell someone to come nearer by using a hand gesture or a nod of the head
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24, p.173.4
Web Links
bronze   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 6 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
bronze won't corrode in salt water
She swirled the dessert wine they'd used to conceal the sweetness, but in the bronze goblet, it was difficult to see the color.†
bronze = made of a type of high-quality metal
From page 237.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a brownish-colored metal with red or yellow hues that is made of copper and (usually) tin
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.41.9
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
a bronze tan
"Yes," Chaol said, his bronze eyes flashing.
bronze = a shining yellowish-brown color (like the metal of the same name)
From page 18.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a reddish-brown or yellowish-brown color like that of one of the metals with the same name — often used to refer to a suntan or a dark glowing complexion
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.18.1
Web Links
contradict
1 use
Oh, he couldn't stand her contradictions!†
contradictions = things that disagree with themselves; or (more rarely) acts of disagreeing

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)
From page 102.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally contradict means:
disagree
in various senses, including:
  • to say something is not true — as in "She contradicted his testimony."
  • to say something else is true when both can't be true — as in "I don't believe her. She contradicted herself as she told us what happened."
  • to be in conflict with — as in "Her assertions contradict accepted scientific principles."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 13, p.102.7
Web Links
demonstrate
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
It demonstrates my point.
She could scale a wall with ease, and had even demonstrated by climbing up to her own balcony with nothing but her bare hands.†
demonstrated = showed
From page 327.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of demonstrate means:
to show
The exact meaning of this sense of demonstrate can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "I will demonstrate how to throw a Frisbee." — show how to do something
  • "I will demonstrate how much quicker the new computer is than the old one." — show how something works
  • "Her questioned demonstrated that she was listening and thinking deeply about what was said." — showed to be true or proved
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library22 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 27, p.204.9
Web Links
direct   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
directly above; or buy direct from
"You shouldn't feel responsible," he said, turning onto his side to look directly into her face.†
directly = straight (exactly where stated; used for emphasis)
From page 385.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of direct means:
straight (exactly where stated); or without involvement of anything in between
The exact meaning of this sense of direct is subject to its context. For example:
  • "The road runs directly to Las Vegas." — straight (without varying from a straight line)
  • "It was a direct hit." — exact
  • "The plant is in direct sunlight." — unobstructed (without anything in between)
  • "She wants a direct meeting with him." — personal (without other people in between)
  • "She paid direct attention to what he was reading." — close
  • "a direct gaze" — straight, steady, or focused—not a brief glance taken while generally looking at other things; not a sideways look
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library62 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 52, p.385.9
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
directed her question to
"That's despicable," he spat, and she blinked at the anger in his voice—anger that, for once, was not directed at her.†
directed = focused, aimed, or intended for
From page 157.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of direct means:
to indicate direction; or to cause movement or focus in a direction or towards an object
The exact meaning of this sense of direct is subject to its context. For example:
  • "intentionally directed fire at unarmed civilians" — aimed a gun
  • "directed the question to her" — aimed a question
  • "directed her north" — pointed in a particular direction
  • "directed attention to the 3rd paragraph" — focused attention on a particular object
  • "The sound of her voice directed him to the kitchen." — guided or gave directions to someone to help them move to a particular place
  • "She directed him to the airport." — gave directions to send someone to a particular place
  • "She directed the boat north." — steered it
  • "directed the letter to" — send a letter to a particular person by putting a name and address on it
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library36 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 22, p.157.6
Web Links
dispose
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
disposed the troops along...
I'm already at your father's disposal.†
disposal = command

(editor's note:  When something is "at someone's disposal" it is "at their command," or "available for their use." They can use it as they please.)
From page 148.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of dispose means:
the arrangement, positioning, or use of things
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 20, p.148.2
Web Links
fawn
1 use
How the court ladies must fawn over you!†
fawn = show excessive flattery or affection
From page 27.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of fawn means:
showing excessive flattery or affection
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.27.1
Web Links
grave
2 uses
They are only to be used as a last defense against evil, or in the gravest of illnesses.†
gravest = most important or most serious
From page 378.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 51, p.378.9
Web Links
however
10 uses
1  —10 uses as in:
However, complications may...
However, she quickly forgot about her sickness when she saw Dorian Havilliard sitting at the table in her bedroom with crossed legs.†
however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
From page 274.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of however means:
though (or another expression that connects contrasting ideas)

(Based on idea 1 we might not expect idea 2, but this is a way of saying that even though idea 1 exists, we still have idea 2.  Synonyms include in spite of that, , nevertheless, nonetheless, on the other hand, in contrastand but.)
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library61 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1, p.1.4
Web Links
imply
2 uses
His clothes weren't as ratty as the other competitors'; the mere fact that she'd actually heard his name implied he must have been a good thief in Perranth.†
implied = suggested (said indirectly)
From page 106.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally imply means:
to suggest or say indirectly — possibly as a logical consequence
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 19, p.138.5
Web Links
malicious
4 uses
Nothing malicious or mocking lay beneath his words.†
malicious = wanting to see others suffer; or threatening evil
From page 36.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 27, p.210.6
Web Links
remnant
9 uses
It still echoed with the remnants of the power that had once given these trees such unnatural beauty.†
remnants = small amounts that remains after the rest is gone
From page 29.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally remnant means:
a small amount that remains after the rest is gone — sometimes specifically of cloth
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.29.5
Web Links
vary
1 use
Most of the court, Dorian included, wore masks of varying sizes, shapes, and colors—some of simple design, others elaborate and animal-shaped.†
varying = differing; or changing
From page 289.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally vary means:
to be different, or to change
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 38, p.289.9
Web Links
yield   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
will yield valuable data
When the book yielded nothing, she returned to the summoning spell.†
yielded = produced
From page 309.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of yield means:
to produce (usually something wanted); or the thing or amount produced
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 41, p.309.3
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
yield to pressure
Chaol didn't know if it was because of Endovier, or just being an assassin; whatever the cause of that unyielding rage, she could never entirely leash herself.†
unyielding = strict, firm, or hard (not giving in, not giving way, or not giving up)

(editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unyielding means not and reverses the meaning of yielding. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
From page 204.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of yield means:
to give in, give way, or give up
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27, p.204.7
Web Links
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