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The Witch of Blackbird Pond

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
accompany
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accompany on the journey
Matthew Wood stood on the threshold of his home, his bushy eyebrows massed close together as he surveyed the three women who waited to accompany him.
accompany = go with
From page 51.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to travel along with
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 5, p.51.1
Web Links
contrast
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
it is a contrast
The bleak line of shore surrounding the gray harbor was a disheartening contrast to the shimmering green and white that fringed the turquoise bay of Barbados which was her home.
contrast = something notably different compared (to something else)
From page 2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
something noticeably different (compared to something else or to other things)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1, p.2
Web Links
deliberate   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 15 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
deliberate insult
Nat's eyes deliberately taunted her.
deliberately = intentionally (on purpose)
From page 13.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of deliberate means:
to do something intentionally (do it on purpose)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.13.6
Web Links
2  —5 uses as in:
need to deliberate
Without a second's deliberation she acted. Kicking off her buckled shoes and dropping the woolen cloak, she plunged headlong over the side of the boat.
deliberation = consideration of the situation

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 8.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of deliberate means:
to think about or discuss — especially with great care
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.74.1
Web Links
3  —6 uses as in:
a deliberate thinker
Lost in her own thoughts, Kit barely noticed that William's dignified pace was even more deliberate than usual.
deliberate = slow
From page 144.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of deliberate means:
done with great care — often slowly
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.35.9
Web Links
demonstrate   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
It demonstrates my point.
Mercy demonstrated on two pieces of thin board to which were fastened strips of leather set with hooked wire teeth. From a great pile of heavy blue wool she pulled a small tuft, caught it in the wire teeth of one board, and drew across it the second board till the fibers were brushed flat.
demonstrated = showed (how something is done)
From page 45.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of demonstrate means:
to show
The exact meaning of this sense of demonstrate can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "I will demonstrate how to throw a Frisbee." — show how to do something
  • "I will demonstrate how much quicker the new computer is than the old one." — show how something works
  • "Her questioned demonstrated that she was listening and thinking deeply about what was said." — showed to be true or proved
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library22 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4, p.45.7
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
demonstrate to protest
Captain Talcott sensed the growing anger in the waiting crowd and raised his voice. "There is to be no demonstration," he reminded them.
demonstration = public protest

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 158.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of demonstrate means:
a public display supporting a cause — usually joining with others in a political protest
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 15, p.158.5
Web Links
direct
12 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
was direct in my instructions
The magistrate spoke to her directly. "I had considered this morning's inquiry merely a formality. I did not expect to find any evidence worthy of carrying to the court. But this is a serious mater. You must explain to us how this child's name came to be written."
directly = in a clear, straightforward manner
From page 215.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of direct means:
straightforward (uncomplicated or simple — perhaps also indicating openness and honesty)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3, p.36.2
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —8 uses
endure
13 uses
1  —13 uses as in:
endured the pain
Was this what strengthened these New Englanders to endure the winter, the knowledge that summer's return would be all the richer for the waiting?
endure = continue to bear (suffer through)
From page 244.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of endure means:
to suffer through (or put up with something difficult or unpleasant)
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library18 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 5, p.54.7
Web Links
grave
10 uses
"A true witch will always float. The innocent ones just sink like a stone." He was obviously paying her back for the morning's humiliation. But she was surprised to see that John Holbrook was not at all amused. His solemn young face was even more grave than before.
grave = serious and solemn
From page 13.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1, p.10.3
Web Links
imply
1 use
What are you implying, Gershom?
implying = suggesting (saying indirectly)
From page 61.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally imply means:
to suggest or say indirectly — possibly as a logical consequence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 6, p.61.3
Web Links
incredulous
6 uses
  "'Tis a strange thing, that the only friends I have I found in the same way, lying flat in the meadows, crying as though their hearts would break."
  The two young people stared at each other. "You?" breathed Kit incredulously.
  Nat laughed. "I'll have you know that I was only eight years old," he explained.
incredulously = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
From page 108.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally incredulous means:
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 9, p.89.4
Web Links
inquire
11 uses
We have come here in order to inquire and search into the matter of Mistress Katherine Tyler, lately of Barbados, who is accused by sundry witnesses of the practice of witchcraft.
inquire = ask
From page 209.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally inquire means:
to ask about or look into something
Word Statistics
Book11 uses
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.2.2
Web Links
magistrate
26 uses
The magistrate and the ministers will examine you.
magistrate = judge
From page 208.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally magistrate means:
a judge or judicial official
The exact meaning of magistrate varies widely depending upon the context. For example:
  • in the U.S. federal court:  assists district court judges by handling minor offenses or administrative tasks such as preliminary hearings (often referred to as a magistrate judge rather than just a magistrate)
  • in some U.S. states:  a judge in the state court
  • in France, Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands, and other civil law countries:  a sitting magistrate is a judge and a standing magistrate is a prosecutor
  • in England:  may be a volunteer without formal legal training who performs a judicial role with regard to minor matters
  • in ancient Rome:  a powerful officer with both judicial and executive power
Word Statistics
Book26 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18, p.203.9
Web Links
novel
2 uses
Kit had no idea that her methods were novel and surprising.
novel = new
From page 84.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of novel means:
new and original — typically something considered good
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 9, p.84.3
Web Links
sober
10 uses
1  —10 uses as in:
a sobering thought
...and then she was laughing with Hannah. But instantly she sobered again.
sobered = became serious
From page 96.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of sobering means:
serious; or making one serious or calm
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.96.6
Web Links
solemn
9 uses
But it's not much fun trying to keep my hand firm and being so solemn all day long.
solemn = serious (with no sense of fun)
From page 104.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally solemn means:
in a very serious (and often dignified) manner
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library20 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.12.6
Web Links
tone
12 uses
Kit recoiled, as much from his angry tone as from the repulsive words.
tone = quality of voice expressing a feeling or mood
From page 23.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of tone means:
the general feeling, mood, or attitude of something — especially of something said or written
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1, p.13.2
Web Links
trace   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 11 uses
1  —8 uses as in:
found a trace of
But Nat had slipped out of the room and his halfhearted pursuers reported not a single trace of him.
trace = indication or sign
From page 223.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
a small quantity; or any indication or evidence of
The exact meaning of this sense of trace depends upon its context. For example:
  • a small indication that something was present — as in "The plane disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean without leaving a trace."
  • a very small amount of something — as in "The blood test showed a trace of steroids."
  • any evidence of something — as in "We did not find a trace of the gene."
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 11, p.117.5
Web Links
2  —3 uses as in:
trace a picture or outline
In the clean white sand on the floor Hannah traced a careful B. Looking at Prudence, Kit held her breath.
traced = drew
From page 117.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
copy the lines of an image; or draw an outline; or carefully draw a specific pattern
This sense of trace has to do with drawing, but it's specific meaning depends on its context. For example:
copying the outline of an image
  • "She used tracing paper to make a copy." — paper you can see through, so that when it is placed on a picture, you can use a pencil to follow the lines of the image being copied
  • "She projected the image onto the wall, hung a sheet of paper there, and traced the projected image onto the paper." — followed the lines with her pencil
draw an outline or a specific pattern
  • "She used her toe to trace half the fish symbol in the sand." — draw a simple outline
  • "The child used a stick to trace circles and swirls in the mud." — draw
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11, p.117.4
Web Links
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