toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

1776

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
consequence   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 29 uses
1  —21 uses as in:
a direct consequence of
The townspeople had been given advance warning and consequently no one was killed, but the entire population was without homes on the eve of winter.†
consequently = resultantly (as a result)
From page 56.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
a result of something (often an undesired side effect)
Word Statistics
Book21 uses
Library28 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1.1, p.11.5
Web Links
2  —8 uses as in:
of little consequence
The reply from Washington, written in Joseph Reed's hand, said, "We have made no discovery of any movement here of any consequence."†
consequence = importance
From page 154.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
importance or relevance
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1.1, p.14.2
Web Links
contrary   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 6 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
contrary to
For contrary to what Washington thought, the British had had no plans for or any intention of engaging the rebels that day, or anytime soon.†
contrary to = in opposition to
From page 219.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1, p.13.2
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
on the contrary
On the contrary, William Howe had little inclination ever to rush things.†
on the contrary = an expression used to intensify denial of an idea
From page 72.4  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3, p.72.4
Web Links
3  —2 uses as in:
to the contrary
Stirling had been ordered by Putnam to "repulse" the enemy, and for lack of orders to the contrary, he and his men had held on for nearly four hours.†
to the contrary = with an opposite or different effect; or something with an opposite or different effect
From page 176.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5, p.176.8
Web Links
contrast   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 5 uses
1  —1 use as in:
contrast their writing styles
Washington, by contrast, was constantly trying to fathom Howe's intentions, his next move.†
by contrast = in a comparison that shows differences
From page 78.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
point to differences between; or compare to show differences
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1.3, p.78.8
Web Links
2  —4 uses as in:
there is a contrast
The contrast between such disorder and flagrant disregard for authority and the perfectly orchestrated landing by Howe's troops could not have been more pronounced.†
contrast = notable difference
From page 161.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
a difference — especially a notable difference; or the side-x-side arrangement of things that draws attention to an unmissable difference
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1.1, p.6.8
Web Links
correspond   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 5 uses
1  —1 use as in:
corresponding time period
She, too, was a patron of the bookstore, a correspondingly plump, gregarious young woman named Lucy Flucker, whose father, Thomas Flucker, was the royal secretary of the province.†
correspondingly = in a manner that is connected or fits together by being equivalent, proportionate, or matched
From page 59.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspond means:
connect or fit together by being equivalent, proportionate, or matched

(Two things are equivalent if they have the same or very similar value, purpose, or result.)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1.2, p.59.1
Web Links
2  —4 uses as in:
corresponding by email
But in private correspondence from his London home, he had been assuring friends that "some[thing] will be done" about America.†
correspondence = communication by written letters or messages
From page 19.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspond means:
communicate by writing letters or email
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1, p.19.1
Web Links
despair
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
do not despair
"Your brother Elihu lies very dangerously sick with a dysentery .... his life is despaired of," wrote Abigail Adams from nearby Braintree to her husband John in Philadelphia.†
despaired = lost hope
From page 30.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of despair means:
to lose hope
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.2, p.30.7
Web Links
establish
6 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
establish a positive tone
The rebellious war .... is manifestly carried on for the purpose of establishing an independent empire.†
establishing = creating
From page 11.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
create, start, or set in [a] place
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library25 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1.1, p.11.7
Web Links
grave
3 uses
"The thaw has been so grave that I've trembled for the consequences, for without snow my very important charge cannot get along."†
grave = serious and solemn
From page 84.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.2, p.57.7
Web Links
inclined
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
I'm inclined to
As scathing as any eyewitness description was that provided by a precocious young New Englander of Loyalist inclinations named Benjamin Thompson, who, after being refused a commission by Washington, served in the British army, later settled in Europe, renamed himself Count Rumford, and ultimately became one of the era's prominent men of science.†
inclinations = tendencies (attitudes favoring)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)
From page 32.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of inclined means:
a tendency, mood, desire, or attitude that favors something; or making someone favor something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.2, p.32.3
Web Links
inhabitant
15 uses
We found that very few, even among the oldest inhabitants, had ever seen a cannon.†
inhabitants = people (who live in a particular place)
From page 85.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally inhabitant means:
a person who lives in a particular place
Word Statistics
Book15 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1, p.8.9
Web Links
minute
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
keep the minutes
In the words of the minutes of the meeting: "It was submitted to the consideration of the council whether, under all circumstances, it would not be eligible to leave Long Island and its dependencies [fortifications] and remove the army to New York."
minutes = formal notes
From page 185.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minutes means:
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5, p.185.9
Web Links
novel
1 use
To the British rank-and-file there was nothing novel about being a soldier.†
novel = new and original
From page 167.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of novel means:
new and original — typically something considered good
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.5, p.167.9
Web Links
positive
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
had a positive effect
The one positive development for Washington was that during his stay in Philadelphia he had convinced Joseph Reed to rejoin the army, to serve as the army's adjutant general—its administrative head—with the rank of colonel, in place of General Horatio Gates, who had been sent by Congress to see what he could do about Canada.†
positive = good
From page 132.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of positive means:
good or beneficial
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.4, p.132.5
Web Links
rectify
1 use
Still, he had no doubt that the "present unfavorable appearance of things" could be rectified readily enough.
rectified = fixed
From page 78.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of rectify means:
correct, fix, or make right
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3, p.78.4
Web Links
rout
1 use
By noon or shortly thereafter the rout was over, the day lost for the Americans.
rout = an overwhelming defeat
From page 178.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of rout means:
an overwhelming defeat; or a disorderly retreat
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5, p.178.5
Web Links
thus far
11 uses
Signed also by Sir William, the new proclamation was their boldest, most generous gesture thus far, they felt.†
thus far = up until now
From page 258.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book11 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1, p.11.3
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
† 
Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.