toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Fast Food Nation

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
bacteria
14 uses
Most E. coli bacteria help us digest food, synthesize vitamins, and guard against dangerous organisms.
bacteria = microorganisms (living creatures so small it takes a microscope to see them)
From page 199.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally bacteria means:
microorganisms (living creatures so small it takes a microscope to see them) that can both cause disease and be beneficial. They are different and larger than viruses.
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.217.2
Web Links
cholesterol
1 use
Amid a barrage of criticism over the amount of cholesterol in their fries, McDonald's switched to pure vegetable oil in 1990.
cholesterol = a substance found in animal fat that when eaten or produced in large quantities increases the probability of getting heart disease
From page 120.6  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.120.6
Web Links
countervail
1 use
Without the countervailing force of labor unions, companies will increasingly seek out and exploit the most vulnerable members of society.
countervailing = opposing (to counterbalance something else)
From page 266.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally countervail means:
to counterbalance, or oppose (the effects of something)—often in such a manner that the effects being opposed are neutralized (made ineffective)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useEpil., p.266.1
Web Links
defame
1 use
Under American law, an accuser must prove that the allegations at the heart of a libel case are not only false and defamatory, but also have been recklessly, negligently, or deliberately spread.
defamatory = hurt someone's reputation (falsely)
From page 245.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally defame means:
to hurt someone's reputation through false statements
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.245.8
Web Links
dispose
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
disposed the troops along...
Ray Kroc could only dream, during McDonald's tough early years, of having such marketing tools at his disposal.†
disposal = command

(editor's note:  When something is "at someone's disposal" it is "at their command," or "available for their use." They can use it as they please.)
From page 40.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of dispose means:
the arrangement, positioning, or use of things
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2, p.40.8
Web Links
eclectic
2 uses
The group's membership was a small, eclectic mix of pacifists, anarchists, vegetarians, and libertarians brought together by a commitment to nonviolent political action.
eclectic = varied
From page 245.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally eclectic means:
a distinctive mix of styles or ideas selected from various sources

or:  

one who selects a distinctive mix of styles or ideas rather than adopting a common set from a single source
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.59.8
Web Links
epiphany
1 use
Like an epiphany, it revealed the strange power of fast food in the new world order.†
epiphany = sudden realization
From page 234.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally epiphany means:
a sudden realization — especially one of importance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.234.4
Web Links
establish
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
establish a positive tone
The team regularly plays against high schools from Colorado Springs, which have well-established hockey programs.†
established = long-existing
From page 103.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
create, start, or set in [a] place
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library25 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4, p.103.9
Web Links
fallacy
2 uses
"The fallacy of composition" is a logical error — a mistaken belief that what seems good for an individual will still be good when others do the same thing.
fallacy = a common form of incorrect reasoning
From page 119.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally fallacy means:
a mistaken belief; or a common form of incorrect reasoning
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.119.7
Web Links
grave
2 uses
The early twentieth century had trusts, but it also had "trustbusters," progressive government officials who believed that concentrated economic power posed a grave threat to American democracy.†
grave = serious and solemn
From page 137.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6, p.137.3
Web Links
Hitler Youth
2 uses
In May of 1923, the Hitler Youth movement was launched in Plauen, and the following year, the little city became the Nazi headquarters for Saxony.†
Hitler Youth = Nazi organization for children aged 10 to 18
From page 226.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.226.7
Web Links
however
43 uses
1  —43 uses as in:
However, complications may...
There are inherent limits, however, on how much this thriving new movement can achieve.†
however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
From page 274.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of however means:
though (or another expression that connects contrasting ideas)

(Based on idea 1 we might not expect idea 2, but this is a way of saying that even though idea 1 exists, we still have idea 2.  Synonyms include in spite of that, , nevertheless, nonetheless, on the other hand, in contrastand but.)
Word Statistics
Book43 uses
Library61 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useIntr., p.10.3
Web Links
illustrate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
as illustrated by this example
Countless other suburban communities, in every part of the country, could have been used to illustrate the same points.†
illustrate = help make clear
From page 7.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of illustrate means:
to help make clear — typically by example
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useIntr., p.7.5
Web Links
minute
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
minute size
The smell of a strawberry arises from the interaction of at least 350 different chemicals that are present in minute amounts.
minute = very small
From page 125.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minute means:
small, exceptionally small, or insignificant
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.75.8
Web Links
Netherlands
2 uses
The Netherlands began to test ground beef for E. coli 0157:H7 in 1989.
Netherlands = A European country (sometimes called Holland) and that literally means "lower countries"
From page 263.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally Netherlands means:
A European country (sometimes called Holland) which together with two autonomous regions in the Caribbean make up the Kingdom of the Netherlands. People of The Netherlands are called Dutch and their language is called Dutch. Netherlands literally means "lower countries". Much of the country is reclaimed land that is below sea level. The country is also known for canals, tulip fields, windmills, and bicycling.
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.124.3
Web Links
olfactory
3 uses
Taste buds offer a relatively limited means of detection, however, compared to the human olfactory system, which can perceive thousands of different chemical aromas.
olfactory = related to the sense of smell
From page 123.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally olfactory means:
relating to the sense of smell
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.123.2
Web Links
positive
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
The test came back positive.
The press release failed to mention that some ground beef from the same lot had indeed been tested — and had tested positive for E. coli 0157:H7.†
positive = indicating that a condition was found
From page 212.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of positive means:
found a condition or substance to be present
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.193.9
Web Links
rebuttal
3 uses
TSRs make about fifteen "presentations" an hour, going for a sale, throwing out one rebuttal after another to avoid being shot down.
rebuttal = argument against (something)
From page 81.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally rebuttal means:
a statement arguing against something
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.81.7
Web Links
theme
6 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
theme of the novel
It's about their theme parks, their next movie, their characters, their videos ....†
theme parks = amusement parks each of which have one or more basic underlying ideas — such as the Magic Kingdom
From page 49.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of theme means:
a basic idea that underlies what is being said or done — especially in a literary or artistic work
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 2, p.49.5
Web Links
waive
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
waive the right
According to Susan Kezios, president of the American Franchise Association, the contracts offered by fast food chains often require a franchisee to waive his or her legal right to file complaints under state law;
waive = give up
From page 99.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of waive means:
not enforce something to which one would otherwise be entitled
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.99.7
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
† 
Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.