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The Glass Castle

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
accompany   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
accompany on the journey
He wanted me to accompany him on a business trip.
accompany = travel with
From page 210.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to travel along with
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st usePart 3, p.210.8
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
illness and accompanying symptoms
I expected him to turn and walk away, but there were six stinging blows on the backs of my thighs, each accompanied by a whistle of air.
accompanied = joined at the same time
From page 220.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to be present with at the same time and/or location
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st usePart 3, p.220.8
Web Links
assume   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 6 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
I assume it's true
"Everyone assumed I was a normal person," she said. "It was weird." Then she told me that it had occurred to her that if she got out of Welch, and away from the family, she might have a shot at a happy life.
assumed = accepted as true (without really knowing)
From page 218.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of assume means:
to accept something as true without proof
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library67 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 1 & 2, p.102.9
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
She assumed a false identity
He grabbed Dad by the shoulder, but Dad pushed him off and assumed a fighting stance.
assumed = took on or adopted
From page 109.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of assume means:
to take on (adopt, wear, strike a pose or appearance of) — often while pretending or disguising
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library33 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 1 & 2, p.109.7
Web Links
conform
2 uses
Mom and Dad liked to make a big point about never surrendering to fear or to prejudice or to the narrow-minded conformist sticks-in-the-mud who tried to tell everyone else what was proper.
conformist = of someone who thinks and acts like others
From page 103.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally conform means:
to comply, fit in, or be similar to what is normal
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 1 & 2, p.103.9
Web Links
direct
3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
was direct in my instructions
Dad whipped us with his belt, but never out of anger, and only if we back-talked or disobeyed a direct order, which was rare.
direct = clear and specific
From page 59.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of direct means:
straightforward (uncomplicated or simple — perhaps also indicating openness and honesty)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 1 & 2, p.59.3
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —2 uses
evaluate
3 uses
Mom let us grade papers that had multiple-choice, true-false, and fill-in-the-blank answers—just about anything except essay questions, which she thought she had to evaluate because they could be answered correctly in all sorts of different ways.
evaluate = think about carefully and make a judgment
From page 74.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally evaluate means:
to think carefully and make a judgment about something
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 1 & 2, p.74.7
Web Links
flout
1 use
Welch wasn't like those other places we had lived, he said. There were rules that had to be followed, and people didn't take it kindly when you flouted them.
flouted = openly disregarded
From page 145.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally flout means:
to openly disregard — typically a law, rule, or custom
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.145.9
Web Links
focus
5 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
Turn your focus to question #2.
When Mom told me I was so focused it was scary, I know she didn't mean it as a compliment, but I took it that way.
focused = paying attention to achieving goals
From page 208.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of focus means:
verb: to concentrate, look at, or pay attention to

noun: the act of concentration, or the ability to concentrate

(to concentrate is to direct attention or effort towards a single thing)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library75 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 3, p.136.5
Web Links
highlight
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
highlights of the year
It was true that many grown-ups in Welch talked about how senior year in high school was the highlight of their lives.
highlight = best part
From page 236.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of highlight means:
something that stands out
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.236.4
malicious
2 uses
I nodded and smiled back, then I realized there was something malicious in her smile.
malicious = wanting to see others suffer
From page 137.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally malicious means:
wanting to see others suffer; or threatening evil
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st usePart 3, p.137.7
Web Links
negative   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 5 uses
1  —1 use as in:
had a negative effect
Fussing over children who cry only encourages them, she told us. That's positive reinforcement for negative behavior.
negative = bad or harmful
From page 28.3  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 1 & 2, p.28.3
Web Links
2  —4 uses as in:
a negative attitude
"I'm not being negative," I said. "I'm trying to be realistic."
negative = pessimistic (focusing on bad things)
From page 187.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of negative means:
pessimistic (emphasizing bad things) or disagreeable
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.187.9
Web Links
perspective
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
Look at it from her perspective
"Look at it from his perspective," Mom said.
perspective = way of seeing and thinking about things
From page 263.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perspective means:
a particular way of seeing or thinking about things
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 4 & 5, p.263.9
Web Links
positive   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 9 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
I'm absolutely positive!
She positively glowed as she told me about the hot meals and the hot showers and all the friends she'd made.
positively = absolutely (used for emphasis)
From page 218.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of positive means:
certain (having no doubt; or used for emphasis)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library22 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1 & 2, p.55.8
Web Links
2  —4 uses as in:
a positive attitude
But the positive thoughts would give way to negative thoughts, and the negative thoughts seemed to swoop into her mind the way a big flock of black crows takes over the landscape, sitting thick in the trees and on the fence rails and lawns, staring at you in ominous silence.
positive = optimistic (focusing on good things)
From page 207.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of positive means:
optimistic (expecting or focusing good things); or agreeable
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.140.1
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —2 uses
redemption   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 6 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
its main redeeming quality is...
"Everyone has something good about them," she said. "You have to find the redeeming quality and love the person for that."
redeeming = making up for the bad
From page 144.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of redemption means:
to make up for something bad; or to save
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.144.8
Web Links
2  —4 uses as in:
redeem the coupon
When we wanted money, we walked along the roadside picking up beer cans and bottles that we redeemed for two cents each.
redeemed = exchanged
From page 62.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of redemption means:
exchange, convert, or pay off
The exact meaning of abnegate can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "to redeem a coupon" — exchange something for something else of value
  • "to redeem stock" — sell or convert to cash
  • "to redeem a mortgage" — pay off a loan
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.215.2
Web Links
Shakespeare
10 uses
Her long hair was streaked with gray, tangled and matted, and her eyes had sunk deep into their sockets, but still she reminded me of the mom she'd been when I was a kid, swan-diving off cliffs and painting in the desert and reading Shakespeare aloud.
Shakespeare = author widely regarded as the greatest in the English language
From page 3.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of Shakespeare means:
English dramatist and poet frequently cited as the greatest writer in the English language and who wrote such works as Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet (1564-1616)
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.227.1
Web Links
squatter
6 uses
But Mom and Dad were clearly proud, and as I listened to them talk—interrupting each other in their excitement to correct points of fact and fill in gaps in the story—about their fellow squatters and the friends they'd made in the neighborhood and the common fight against the city's housing agency, it became clear they'd stumbled on an entire community of people like themselves, people who lived unruly lives battling authority and who liked it that way.
squatters = people who live in an unoccupied place without legal right
From page 267.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally squatter means:
someone who lives in an unoccupied place without the legal right
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 4 & 5, p.266.2
Web Links
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