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Unbroken by Hillenbrand

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
accompany   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 5 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
accompany on the journey
The police went to Shizuka Watanabe and asked her and her family to accompany them to the mountain.
accompany = travel with
From page 361.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to travel along with
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 4.25, p.252.6
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
law and accompanying regulations
At Hamilton Field, an artist was working his way down the planes, painting each one's name and accompanying illustration.
accompanying = provided with (to improve)
From page 63.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
complement (to provide with something else to make it whole or better)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 2.6, p.63.5
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
illness and accompanying symptoms
We regret the unhappiness that must have accompanied the news of his reported death but hope that the efforts of his fellow prisoners of war on "Postman Calls" will (atone) in some small way for the error.
accompanied = occurred with
From page 254.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to be present with at the same time and/or location
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 4.25, p.254.9
Web Links
compose   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 5 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
compose a poem
Finally, a letter arrived, composed by Harvey and dictated to a nurse from his hospital bed.
composed = written
From page 255.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compose means:
to write or create something with care — especially music or a literary work, but could be other things as diverse as a plan or a letter
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3.13, p.136.5
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
composed of many parts
...this preliminary list was composed of those accused of the worst crimes, including list-topper Hideki Tojo, mastermind of Pearl Harbor and the man on whose orders POWs had been enslaved and starved, and Masahuru Homma, who was responsible for the Bataan Death March.
composed = made up
From page 334.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compose means:
to create something by arranging parts; or to be those parts
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 5.34, p.334.9
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
keep your composure
When she pulled up at her parents' house, she had to compose herself before she walked in.
compose = calm
From page 138.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compose means:
to calm someone or settle something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3.13, p.138.9
Web Links
contrast   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
contrast their writing styles
The battle was so high that only the giant, shining bombers were consistently visible; the fighters, tiny in contrast, flickered in and out of view as the sunlight caught them.
in contrast = a comparison
From page 263.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
point to differences between; or compare to show differences
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4.26, p.263.5
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
there is a contrast
The snow was so deep that residents had dug vertical tunnels to get in and out of their homes. The contrast to fire-blackened Tokyo was jarring.
contrast = difference (in this case, of the snow to...)
From page 276.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
a difference — especially a notable difference; or the side-x-side arrangement of things that draws attention to an unmissable difference
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4.27, p.276.7
Web Links
critical
13 uses
1  —13 uses as in:
a critical problem
Having left USC a few credits short, he had no college degree, a critical asset in a job market glutted with veterans and former war production workers.
critical = important

(editor's note:  In this context, an asset is something of value.)
From page 349.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of critical means:
important, serious, or dangerous
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.7, p.76.1
Web Links
engage   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 6 uses
1  —1 use as in:
engage in conversation
The Japanese turned on civilians, engaging in killing contests, raping tens of thousands of people, mutilating and crucifying them, and provoking dogs to maul them.
engaging = being involved
From page 88.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of engage means:
to interact in various ways — such as to participate, involve, interest, or attract
The exact meaning of this sense of engage depends upon its context. For example:
  • "They engaged in debate." — participated
  • "She engaged him in conversation." — involved
  • "She is an engaging conversationalist." — interesting
  • "She has an engaging smile." — attractive (attracting interest and interaction)
  • "The proposal engages the interest of many young voters." — attracts and involves
  • "She engages with her constituents." — interacts in a meaningful way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.8, p.88.7
Web Links
2  —3 uses as in:
engaged and then married
In critical ways, she was engaged to a stranger.
engaged = in an agreement to marry
From page 341.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of engaged means:
promised to marry
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.6, p.57.7
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —2 uses
establish   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 5 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
establish a positive tone
Stories of cannibalism among castaways were so common that British sailors considered the practice of choosing and sacrificing a victim to be an established "custom of the sea."
established = existing, or set in place
From page 149  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
create, start, or set in [a] place
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library25 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4.22, p.223
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
establish that there is a need
This is one of the many examples of the men missing in action erroneously reported and later being established as a lie.
established = shown or proven
From page 254.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
show or determine (cause to be recognized or figure out)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4.25, p.254.4
Web Links
illustrate
4 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
as illustrated by this example
Right or wrong, Louie's suspicions illustrated how sensitive he was to the idea that he was unworthy of Cynthia.
illustrated = helped make clear
From page 343  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of illustrate means:
to help make clear — typically by example
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 5.34, p.343
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —2 uses
propaganda
16 uses
...Japanese photographers circled, snapping photos. Then, just as the men were ready to devour the fruit, the order came to put it all back. The entire thing had been staged for propaganda.
propaganda = one-sided information that is purposefully spread to influence opinions
From page 268.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally propaganda means:
one-sided information that is purposefully spread to influence opinions — often misleading information of a political nature
Word Statistics
Book16 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4.19, p.195.1
Web Links
ration
42 uses
Because rations were halved for sick men who were unable to work, the ill couldn't recover.
rations = fixed portions of food
From page 235.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally ration means:
verb:  to restrict the amount of something each person can have — such as food or gasoline when there is a shortage, or when more is wanted than is available

or:

noun:  a fixed portion of something that is given as a person's share — such as goods of which there is a shortage, or food for soldiers in the field
Word Statistics
Book42 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4.21, p.213.9
Web Links
trace   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 16 uses
1  —9 uses as in:
found a trace of
Metal dog tags were confiscated, in an apparent effort to comply with the stipulation that those executing POWs "not .... leave any traces."
traces = indications of what had happened
From page 292.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
a small quantity; or any indication or evidence of
The exact meaning of this sense of trace depends upon its context. For example:
  • a small indication that something was present — as in "The plane disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean without leaving a trace."
  • a very small amount of something — as in "The blood test showed a trace of steroids."
  • any evidence of something — as in "We did not find a trace of the gene."
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4.19, p.199.4
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
trace a picture or outline
Then he focused on Jesus bending down, his finger tracing words in the sand at the Pharisees' feet, sending the men scattering in fear.
tracing = drawing
From page 373.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
copy the lines of an image; or draw an outline; or carefully draw a specific pattern
This sense of trace has to do with drawing, but it's specific meaning depends on its context. For example:
copying the outline of an image
  • "She used tracing paper to make a copy." — paper you can see through, so that when it is placed on a picture, you can use a pencil to follow the lines of the image being copied
  • "She projected the image onto the wall, hung a sheet of paper there, and traced the projected image onto the paper." — followed the lines with her pencil
draw an outline or a specific pattern
  • "She used her toe to trace half the fish symbol in the sand." — draw a simple outline
  • "The child used a stick to trace circles and swirls in the mud." — draw
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5.38, p.373.1
Web Links
3  —6 uses as in:
traced a path
Louie told the story as the Japanese listened in silent fascination, tracing the journey on a map.
tracing = following
From page 173.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
to follow
The exact meaning of this sense of trace depends upon its context. For example:
  • "The hunters traced the deer into the woods." — followed or tracked
  • "With soft kisses, she gently traced the scar running down his cheek." — followed
  • "The path traces along the edge of the forest." — follows
  • "A single tear traced its way down her cheek." — followed a specific path
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.12, p.129.6
Web Links
virtual
20 uses
1  —20 uses as in:
virtual organization
Virtually every POW believed that the destruction of this city had saved them from execution.
virtually = almost
From page 320.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of virtual means:
to almost be something; or to effectively be something without entirely being it in a traditional sense
Word Statistics
Book20 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.1, p.6.1
Web Links
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