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The Ransom of Red Chief

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
accord
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
according to, or in accord with
In the other he had the sharp case-knife we used for slicing bacon; and he was industriously and realistically trying to take Bill's scalp, according to the sentence that had been pronounced upon him the evening before.†
according to = as stated by; or in agreement with
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
in keeping with; or in agreement/harmony/unity with
This sense of accord is often seen in the form according to or accordingly where it can take on more specific meanings. For example:
  • "According to Kim, ..." — as stated by
  • "To each according to her ability." — based upon
  • "Points are scored according to how well they perform." — depending upon
  • "The dose is calculated according to body weight." — in proportion to
  • "We got a flat tire. Accordingly, I pulled to the side of the road." — because of what was just said; or as a result
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library53 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
chronic
1 use
"No," says Bill, "nothing chronic except malaria and accidents.†
chronic = of something bad:  long-lasting or happening all the time — especially of disease
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
collaborate
1 use
So, to relieve Bill, I acceded, and we collaborated a letter that ran this way: Ebenezer Dorset, Esq.: We have your boy concealed in a place far from Summit.†
collaborated = worked together
DefinitionGenerally collaborate means:
work together on a common enterprise or project

or more rarely and especially in the form collaborator:  cooperate with the enemy as a traitor
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
commend
1 use
I had a scheme for collecting that ransom without danger of being caught by counterplots that ought to commend itself to professional kidnappers.†
commend = praise or recommend
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
contiguous
1 use
I went up on the peak of the little mountain and ran my eye over the contiguous vicinity.†
contiguous = with a common boundary; or very close in space or time
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
external
1 use
There was a sylvan attitude of somnolent sleepiness pervading that section of the external outward surface of Alabama that lay exposed to my view.†
external = outside
DefinitionGenerally external means:
outside
in various senses, including:
  • coming from or existing outside a place, organization or thing — as in "external trade"
  • forming or relating to an outside boundary — as in "external walls"
  • on the surface or superficial as contrasted to something that is deep or complete — as in "external appearances"
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
fraudulent
1 use
Bill and me had a joint capital of about six hundred dollars, and we needed just two thousand dollars more to pull off a fraudulent town-lot scheme in Western Illinois with.†
fraudulent = intended to deceive
DefinitionGenerally fraudulent means:
intentional deception — usually for financial gain or ego
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
humiliate
1 use
They weren't yells, or howls, or shouts, or whoops, or yawps, such as you'd expect from a manly set of vocal organs—they were simply indecent, terrifying, humiliating screams, such as women emit when they see ghosts or caterpillars.†
humiliating = extremely embarrassing (decreasing dignity)
DefinitionGenerally humiliate means:
extremely embarrass (decrease dignity, self-respect, or pride — especially in front of others)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
impudent
1 use
"Great pirates of Penzance!" says I; "of all the impudent—"†
impudent = improperly bold or disrespectful — especially toward someone who is older or considered to be of higher status
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
ineffable
1 use
Bill is puffing and blowing, but there is a look of ineffable peace and growing content on his rose-pink features.†
ineffable = something that cannot be put into words
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
Web Links
inhabitant
1 use
It contained inhabitants of as undeleterious and self-satisfied a class of peasantry as ever clustered around a Maypole.†
inhabitants = people (who live in a particular place)
DefinitionGenerally inhabitant means:
a person who lives in a particular place
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
martyr
1 use
There was martyrs in old times," goes on Bill, "that suffered death rather than give up the particular graft they enjoyed.†
martyrs = dies or suffers due to upholding principle; or people who have suffered such a fate
DefinitionGenerally martyr means:
someone who dies or suffers to uphold principles — especially someone killed for refusing to renounce their religion, or someone who commits a suicide death in the name of their religion

or:

someone who suffers a great deal
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
mortgage
1 use
The father was respectable and tight, a mortgage fancier and a stern, upright collection-plate passer and forecloser.†
mortgage = a real estate loan; or pledging something for a loan
DefinitionGenerally mortgage means:
a real estate loan; or to offer real estate as collateral for a loan

(collateral is something that has to be given to the lender if the loan isn't paid as agreed)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
pervasive
1 use
There was a sylvan attitude of somnolent sleepiness pervading that section of the external outward surface of Alabama that lay exposed to my view.†
pervading = spreading or filling
DefinitionGenerally pervasive means:
existing throughout something; or generally widespread
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
porous
1 use
His father peeled him away gradually, like a porous plaster.†
porous = allowing passage through a barrier
DefinitionGenerally porous means:
allowing passage through a barrier
The barrier can be physical or figurative — such as:
  • a membrane, asphalt or other material that is full of tiny holes that permit penetration by a fluid or gas
  • a border or other barrier that is not effective (for example, permitting illegal crossing)
  • an ineffective sports defense
  • a law or other rule that is full of loopholes
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
Web Links
predominant
1 use
I'm a grown person with masculine proclivities and habits of self-defense, but there is a time when all systems of egotism and predominance fail.
predominance = power or influence
DefinitionGenerally predominant means:
most frequent, common, or important; or having more power and influence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
Web Links
proclivity
1 use
I'm a grown person with masculine proclivities and habits of self-defense, but there is a time when all systems of egotism and predominance fail.†
proclivities = tendencies
DefinitionGenerally proclivity means:
a tendency, inclination, preference, or strength
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
Web Links
subjugate
1 use
None of 'em ever was subjugated to such supernatural tortures as I have been.
subjugated = forced to submit
DefinitionGenerally subjugate means:
to force into submission
in various senses, including:
  • when a people are defeated in battle and oppressed — as in "The Romans subjugated most of Europe."
  • when something is treated as less important than something else — as in "subjugate the desires of the individual to the desires of the state," or "subjugate instinct to reason"
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
Web Links
therefore
1 use
Philoprogenitiveness, says we, is strong in semi-rural communities; therefore and for other reasons, a kidnapping project ought to do better there than in the radius of newspapers that send reporters out in plain clothes to stir up talk about such things.†
therefore = for that reason
DefinitionGenerally therefore means:
for that reason (what follows is so because of what was just said)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library24 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
treachery
1 use
If you attempt any treachery or fail to comply with our demand as stated, you will never see your boy again.†
treachery = betrayal
DefinitionGenerally treachery means:
the behavior of someone who pretends to be a friend and then tricks, cheats, or betrays
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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