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Paul's Case

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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aggrieve
1 use
His teachers were asked to state their respective charges against him, which they did with such a rancor and aggrievedness as evinced that this was not a usual case, Disorder and impertinence were among the offenses named, yet each of his instructors felt that it was scarcely possible to put into words the real cause of the trouble, which lay in a sort of hysterically defiant manner of the boy's; in the contempt which they all knew he felt for them, and which he seemingly made not the...†
aggrievedness = the state of feeling harmed by unfair treatment

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
DefinitionGenerally aggrieve means:
feeling harmed by unfair treatment; or (more rarely) harming someone unfairly
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
Web Links
anecdote
1 use
The men on the steps—all in their shirt sleeves, their vests unbuttoned—sat with their legs well apart, their stomachs comfortably protruding, and talked of the prices of things, or told anecdotes of the sagacity of their various chiefs and overlords.†
anecdotes = short, true stories
DefinitionGenerally anecdote means:
a short story that is true — often told for amusement or to make a point
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
apprehensive
1 use
The only thing that at all surprised him was his own courage-for he realized well enough that he had always been tormented by fear, a sort of apprehensive dread that, of late years, as the meshes of the lies he had told closed about him, had been pulling the muscles of his body tighter and tighter.†
apprehensive = nervous or worried
DefinitionGenerally apprehensive means:
worried over possible misfortune
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
attribute
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
I attribute it to...
This conscious expression, since it was as far as possible from boyish mirthfulness, was usually attributed to insolence or "smartness."
attributed = credited (pointed to as the cause of something)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of attribute means:
to credit (a source for something)
in two typical senses:
  • "I attribute it to her work." — to say who or what made something happen
  • "Remember to attribute any quotations in your paper." — indicate the source of a quotation or idea
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
Web Links
flippant
1 use
His teachers felt this afternoon that his whole attitude was symbolized by his shrug and his flippantly red carnation flower, and they fell upon him without mercy, his English teacher leading the pack.†
flippantly = with an inappropriate lack of seriousness
DefinitionGenerally flippant means:
showing an inappropriate lack of seriousness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
humiliate
2 uses
His teachers left the building dissatisfied and unhappy; humiliated to have felt so vindictive toward a mere boy, to have uttered this feeling in cutting terms, and to have set each other on, as it were, in the gruesome game of intemperate reproach.†
humiliated = extremely embarrassed (decreased dignity)
DefinitionGenerally humiliate means:
extremely embarrass (decrease dignity, self-respect, or pride — especially in front of others)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
indigent
1 use
They were hardworking women, most of them supporting indigent husbands or brothers, and they laughed rather bitterly at having stirred the boy to such fervid and florid inventions.†
indigent = so poor as to lack basic necessities like food and shelter; or people in that condition
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
Web Links
inquiry
1 use
He was so much later than usual that there would certainly be inquiries and reproaches.†
inquiries = questions or investigations
DefinitionGenerally inquiry means:
the act of asking a question or performing an investigation
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
insolent
2 uses
This conscious expression, since it was as far as possible from boyish mirthfulness, was usually attributed to insolence or "smartness."†
insolence = rude, disrespectful behavior or action
DefinitionGenerally insolent means:
rudely disrespectful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
irrelevant
1 use
Once well into the country, Paul dismissed the carriage and walked, floundering along the tracks, his mind a medley of irrelevant things.†
irrelevant = not relevant (not related to the subject being considered, or not important enough to want to consider)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
Web Links
loathe
3 uses
Paul never went up Cordelia Street without a shudder of loathing.†
loathing = disgust or intense dislike
DefinitionGenerally loathe means:
hate, detest, or intensely dislike
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
monotonous
2 uses
It was a highly respectable street, where all the houses were exactly alike, and where businessmen of moderate means begot and reared large families of children, all of whom went to Sabbath school and learned the shorter catechism, and were interested in arithmetic; all of whom were as exactly alike as their homes, and of a piece with the monotony in which they lived.†
monotony = lack of variety
DefinitionGenerally monotonous means:
lacking in variety — typically boring
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
omnipotent
1 use
Above, about, within it all was the rumble and roar, the hurry and toss of thousands of human beings as hot for pleasure as himself, and on every side of him towered the glaring affirmation of the omnipotence of wealth.†
omnipotence = the quality of being all powerful
DefinitionGenerally omnipotent means:
all powerful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
perplex
2 uses
He had been suspended a week ago, and his father had called at the Principal's office and confessed his perplexity about his son.†
perplexity = confusion due to complexity
DefinitionGenerally perplex means:
to confuse
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
plausible
1 use
He told his story plausibly and had no trouble, since he volunteered to pay for them in advance, in engaging his rooms; a sleeping room, sitting room, and bath.†
plausibly = with apparent reasonableness (though unproven)
DefinitionGenerally plausible means:
apparently reasonable, but unproven
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
Web Links
proclivity
1 use
They occasionally looked over the multitude of squabbling children, listened affectionately to their high-pitched, nasal voices, smiling to see their own proclivities reproduced in their offspring, and interspersed their legends of the iron kings with remarks about their sons' progress at school, their grades in arithmetic, and the amounts they had saved in their toy banks.
proclivities = tendencies
DefinitionGenerally proclivity means:
a tendency, inclination, preference, or strength
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
Web Links
protrude
2 uses
The snow was whirling in curling eddies above the white bottom lands, and the drifts lay already deep in the fields and along the fences, while here and there the long dead grass and dried weed stalks protruded black above it.†
protruded = stuck out
DefinitionGenerally protrude means:
to stick out from
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
remorse
2 uses
The manager at Carnegie Hall was told to get another usher in his stead; the doorkeeper at the theater was warned not to admit him to the house; and Charley Edwards remorsefully promised the boy's father not to see him again.†
remorsefully = with regret for doing something that was wrong
DefinitionGenerally remorse means:
a feeling of deep regret for doing something that was wrong
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
reproach
2 uses
He was so much later than usual that there would certainly be inquiries and reproaches.†
reproaches = criticizes; or criticisms
DefinitionGenerally reproach means:
a criticism; or to express criticism — especially where a relationship makes the disapproval result in disappointment or shame
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
Web Links
subsequent
1 use
She betrayed some embarrassment when she handed Paul the tickets, and a hauteur which subsequently made her feel very foolish.†
subsequently = following something else
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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