toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

The Child by Tiger

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
allude
1 use
Sometimes on these occasions his speech would be made up of some weird jargon of Biblical phrases and quotations and allusions, of which he seemed to have hundreds, and which he wove together in the strange pattern of his emotion in a sequence that was meaningless to them but to which he himself had the coherent clue.†
allusions = indirect references

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
DefinitionGenerally allude means:
to make an indirect reference
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
Web Links
appalling
1 use
And both of them still stared at him with an expression of appalled and fascinated interest.†
appalled = shocked by how terrible or horrible something is
DefinitionGenerally appalling means:
shockingly terrible or horrible
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
austere
1 use
But even the very bare austerity of that little room now seemed terribly alive with the presence of its recent black 524 tenant.†
austerity = a government policy in which significantly less money is spent than normal; or any notable absence of luxury, comfort, or decoration
DefinitionGenerally austere means:
a notable absence of luxury, comfort, or decoration

or:

of a person:  stern in manner; or practicing great self-denial
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
bewilder
2 uses
For the boys, it was a troubling and bewildering experience.†
bewildering = confusing
DefinitionGenerally bewilder means:
to confuse someone
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library17 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
brusque
1 use
He nodded and passed her brusquely, going towards the phone.†
brusquely = abruptly (suddenly and quickly — without taking the time to be friendly)
DefinitionGenerally brusque means:
abrupt (sudden and quick — without taking the time to be friendly)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
chronicle
1 use
And swiftly, like a flash, running from group to group, like a powder train of fire, the full detail of that bloody chronicle of night was pieced together.†
chronicle = a record of events; or the act of creating such a record or telling others of the events
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
clamor
2 uses
His words cut out above the shouts and clamor of the mob like an electric spark.†
clamor = loud noise and/or persistent demands
DefinitionGenerally clamor means:
loud noise and/or persistent demands — especially from human voice
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
contempt
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
feels contempt towards her
And Nebraska, fearless, blunt, outspoken, as he always was, turned abruptly, put two fingers to his lips and spat between them, widely and contemptuously.†
contemptuously = with disrespect
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
deride
1 use
They tried to drown him out with an angry and derisive roar.†
derisive = contemptuous (treating as inferior and unworthy of respect)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
earnest
1 use
They promised earnestly that they would keep his secret as if it were their own.†
earnestly = sincerely or seriously
DefinitionGenerally earnest means:
characterized by sincere belief

or:

intensely or excessively serious
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
Web Links
eloquent
3 uses
Now cose," he went on quietly, with a shade of resignation, "if you want to tell on me you can — but" — here his voice fell again, with just the faintest yet most eloquent shade of sorrowful regret — "Ole Dick was lookin' fahwad to this.†
eloquent = powerful use of language
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
entreat
1 use
In response to all entreaties, all efforts to find the reason for her sudden and unreasonable decision.†
entreaties = earnest requests
DefinitionGenerally entreat means:
to ask — especially while trying hard to overcome resistance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
erratic
1 use
It hit the street and bounded back and forth with that peculiarly erratic bounce a football has.†
erratic = irregular or unpredictable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
gesticulate
1 use
At this moment there was a flurry in the crowd and Uncle Morris Teitlebaum, the pawnbroker, appeared, gesticulating volubly, clinging to a policeman.†
gesticulating = making gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
DefinitionGenerally gesticulate means:
to make gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
loathe
2 uses
It was a kind of shadow, a poisonous blackness filled with bewildered loathing.†
loathing = disgust or intense dislike
DefinitionGenerally loathe means:
hate, detest, or intensely dislike
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
magistrate
1 use
The call was for Wilson Redmond, the police court magistrate.†
magistrate = judicial official
DefinitionGenerally magistrate means:
a judge or judicial official
The exact meaning of magistrate varies widely depending upon the context. For example:
  • in the U.S. federal court:  assists district court judges by handling minor offenses or administrative tasks such as preliminary hearings (often referred to as a magistrate judge rather than just a magistrate)
  • in some U.S. states:  a judge in the state court
  • in France, Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands, and other civil law countries:  a sitting magistrate is a judge and a standing magistrate is a prosecutor
  • in England:  may be a volunteer without formal legal training who performs a judicial role with regard to minor matters
  • in ancient Rome:  a powerful officer with both judicial and executive power
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
morose
1 use
Then, putting on her hat and coat, and taking the paper bag of "leavings" she was allowed to take home with her at night, she went out the kitchen door and made her sullen and morose departure.†
morose = unhappy
DefinitionGenerally morose means:
unhappy — often with a withdrawn personality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
plaintive
1 use
His moaney vas goodl" he said plaintively, lifting his hands and looking around with an expression of finality.†
plaintively = in a sad manner
DefinitionGenerally plaintive means:
expressing sadness — sometimes with a plea for help
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
tact
1 use
But Dick, with his quick watchfulness, his gentle and persuasive tact, was careful to see this did not happen.†
tact = the ability or act of saying or handling things in such a way that others feel good about them
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
Web Links
yield
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
yield to pressure
And the reason for this is that it comes to people in the South not as the grim, unyielding tenant of the Winter's keep, but as a strange and wild visitor from the secret North.†
unyielding = strict, firm, or hard (not giving in, not giving way, or not giving up)

(editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unyielding means not and reverses the meaning of yielding. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of yield means:
to give in, give way, or give up
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
† 
Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.