toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Hush, Hush

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
adapt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
adapted to the new rules
I blinked several times in succession, helping my eyes hurry and adapt to the scant light.†
adapt = change to fit a different situation; or make suitable
From page 307.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of adapt means:
changed to fit a different situation; or made suitable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useAll, p.307.7
Web Links
agitate
1 use
You sound agitated .... flustered .... aroused.†
agitated = not calm; or stirred up (often emotionally)
From page 131  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally agitate means:
to stir up or shake — emotionally (as when people are angered or upset) or physically (as when a washing machine cleans clothes)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useAll, p.131
Web Links
approach
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
use the best approach
If I had any illusions about keeping up with him, I was going to have to figure out a new approach.†
approach = way of doing something
From page 37.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
a way of doing something; or a route that leads to a particular place
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useAll, p.11.6
Web Links
banish
5 uses
As punishment for this grave sin and for deserting their duties, God stripped the angels' wings and banished them to Earth forever.†
banished = expelled or gotten rid of
From page 251.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally banish means:
to expel or get rid of
in various senses, including:
  • to force someone to leave a country as punishment
  • to push an idea from the mind
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAll, p.251.1
Web Links
collide
4 uses
It collided with my face, smelling strongly of leather.†
collided = crashed together with violent impact; or came into conflict
From page 87.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally collide means:
crash together with violent impact; or come into conflict
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAll, p.275.7
Web Links
deceive
4 uses
Just like him, I'm a deceiver.†
deceiver = someone who lies or misleads
From page 361.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally deceive means:
to lie to or mislead someone — occasionally to lie to oneself by denying reality
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAll, p.2.2
Web Links
erratic
2 uses
My heartbeat turned erratic, and I told myself to pull it together.†
erratic = irregular or unpredictable
From page 46.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useAll, p.251.2
Web Links
evaluate
2 uses
Her eyes were raisins, beady and dark, and they twitched their way over me in almost predatory evaluation.†
evaluation = the process of thinking carefully and making a judgment about something

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 271.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally evaluate means:
to think carefully and make a judgment about something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useAll, p.271.4
Web Links
foreshadow
1 use
I hoped my chocolate-free diet didn't foreshadow what would happen if I tried to avoid Patch.†
foreshadow = is/are a sign of
From page 135.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally foreshadow means:
to be a sign of future events
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useAll, p.135.3
Web Links
highlight
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
highlights of the year
The highlight of my night.†
highlight = best part
From page 64.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of highlight means:
something that stands out
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAll, p.64.1
humiliate
4 uses
On the surface, this was a bad thing because it was, well, humiliating.†
humiliating = extremely embarrassing (decreasing dignity)
From page 180.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally humiliate means:
extremely embarrass (decrease dignity, self-respect, or pride — especially in front of others)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAll, p.180.5
Web Links
imply
3 uses
There was an implied Or else.†
implied = suggested (said indirectly)
From page 11.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally imply means:
to suggest or say indirectly — possibly as a logical consequence
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useAll, p.11.8
Web Links
incredulous
3 uses
An incredulous smile dawned on her face.†
incredulous = unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
From page 323.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useAll, p.273.2
Web Links
irony
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
verbal irony
I detected the slightest irony on the word "Coach," but I couldn't figure out any hidden meaning.†
irony = saying one thing while meaning something else
From page 29.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
saying one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else — usually as humor or sarcasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAll, p.29.9
Web Links
judicious
1 use
Very judicious, considering the crime that banished you here in the first place.
judicious = sensible
From page 292.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally judicious means:
showing good judgment
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAll, p.292.4
Web Links
mortal
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
mortal body
Spending your days keeping mortals out of danger .... could be fun, depending on the mortal you're assigned."†
mortals = humans (especially merely humans) or people subject to death
From page 311.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of mortal means:
human (especially merely human); or subject to death
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAll, p.311.6
Web Links
optimistic
2 uses
"He likes pool," I offered optimistically.†
optimistically = expecting the best; or focusing on the good part of things
From page 190.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useAll, p.190.6
Web Links
perceptible
1 use
A perceptible chill rippled from my heart through the rest of my body.
perceptible = noticeable
From page 369.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally perceptible means:
capable of being noticed — typically because it is different enough or large enough
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAll, p.369.1
Web Links
scorn
1 use
He said, "Even though you'd thrive at all three schools, you scorn them for being a cliche of achievement.†
scorn = disrespect or reject as not good enough
From page 14.1  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useAll, p.14.1
Web Links
scrutiny
4 uses
Stepping back, he gave me a thorough twice-over, seemingly scrutinizing any imperfections—his eyes shifted up and down, here and there.†
scrutinizing = looking at very carefully

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word to a verb. This is the same pattern you see in words like apologize, theorize, and dramatize.)
From page 124  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally scrutiny means:
careful examination of something
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useAll, p.124
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
† 
Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.