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Beastly

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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compensate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
she compensates with extra effort
Could I be getting smarter to compensate for my hideousness?
compensate = adjust or make up for
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compensate means:
make up for; or adjust for
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st usePart 3
Web Links
contrast
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
there is a contrast
A moment later, she's wearing it, and it is exactly as I remember, the cool green satin contrasting with the warm pink of her skin.
contrasting = differing
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
a difference — especially a notable difference; or the side-x-side arrangement of things that draws attention to an unmissable difference
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useEpil.
Web Links
cower
1 use
I cowered, afraid of killing her with my claws.
cowered = showed fear by positioning the body (in this case, withdrawn away from her)
DefinitionGenerally cower means:
show fear by positioning the body as though afraid of being hit
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2
Web Links
Cupid
7 uses
Psyche marries handsome Cupid, but since he only comes to her after dark, her sisters persuade her that he is a monster.
Cupid = Roman mythology:  god of love; a small, winged boy whose arrows make those struck fall in love

(editor's note:  Although he is primarily thought of as a chubby, winged boy in popular culture, the tale of he and Psyche is from an earlier period when he was thought of as a strikingly handsome.)
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
deride
1 use
Lindy's tone is derisive as she passes back copies of the Tuttle homecoming court ballot.
derisive = contemptuous (treating others as inferior and unworthy of respect)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useEpil.
Web Links
divine
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
to forgive is divine
"You dance divinely, my dear Ida," I said.
divinely = wonderfully
DefinitionGenerally this sense of divine means:
wonderful; or god-like or coming from God
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 5
Web Links
entangled
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
entangled in the branches
I pushed her away, but we were too entangled and she stumbled, making a final grab for my neck.
entangled = twisted together
DefinitionGenerally this sense of entangled means:
caught in

or:

twisted together into a confusing mass
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
hideous
7 uses
You led me to believe you were hideous, a monster.
hideous = extremely ugly, offensive, and/or frightening
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2
Web Links
hybrid
2 uses
They aren't as detailed as the hybrid tea roses.
hybrid = crossbred (from two other types of roses)
DefinitionGenerally hybrid means:
something of mixed origin
in various senses, including:
  • of cars — powered by both electricity and gasoline
  • in biology — a plant or animal produced by crossbreeding
  • in linguistics — a word that is composed of parts from different languages (e.g., monolingual has a Greek prefix and a Latin root)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 4
Web Links
impulsive
1 use
In my youth, I tended to be impulsive—turn someone into a frog first, ask questions later.
impulsive = with a tendency to take action without forethought
DefinitionGenerally impulsive means:
action without forethought; or such a tendency
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 6
Web Links
induce
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
induce symptoms
Magic and beasts only exist in fairy tales—or maybe drug-induced hallucinations.
induced = caused (in this case, caused by drugs)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of induce means:
to cause something to arise or happen
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePart 6
Web Links
opaque
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
opaque shower door
Through the almost opaque blinds, I could see the sky was dark.
opaque = not able to see through
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
opera
10 uses
He was a murderer who terrorized the opera house for years before kidnapping a young singer and trying to force her to be the love he was denied.
opera = (used for) classical music plays in which most of the dialogue is sung
DefinitionGenerally opera means:
a musical play with orchestra in which most dialogue is sung — (typically associated with classical music and often in a language foreign to the audience)

or:

the art form (or describing something as related to it) that consists of musical plays with orchestra in which most dialogue is sung
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1
Web Links
pathetic
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
Her pathetic look saddened us.
If she pitied me, she might think that I was some pathetic creature who was going to try to drag her off and force her to be mine, like the Phantom of the Opera.
pathetic = pitiful (arousing pity)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 4
Web Links
philanthropy
1 use
When did you get so philanthropic, Kyle?
philanthropic = (interested in) helping others
DefinitionGenerally philanthropy means:
helping others — especially donating money to worthy causes; or an organization that does so
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 4
Web Links
preposterous
1 use
"Preposterous," he said. "There's no such thing as witches."
preposterous = absurd, outrageous, silly, or completely unreasonable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
Shakespeare
7 uses
Shakespeare talks about how the rose has perfume that makes it beautiful on the inside.
Shakespeare = author widely regarded as the greatest in the English language and whose works include Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet
DefinitionGenerally this sense of Shakespeare means:
English dramatist and poet frequently cited as the greatest writer in the English language and who wrote such works as Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet (1564-1616)
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 4
Web Links
sonnet
7 uses
Okay, check out Sonnet Fifty-four. I think you'll like it.
sonnet = a poem consisting of 14 lines with a fixed rhyme scheme

(editor's note:  In this case, the reference is to one of Shakespeare's poems.)
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 4
Web Links
tentative
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
said it tentatively
I walked up to the door and knocked, tentative and soft.
tentative = carefully and uncertain of what would happen
DefinitionGenerally this sense of tentative means:
done in a careful or unsure way (indicating a lack of confidence in exactly what will happen)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st usePart 4
Web Links
theme
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
theme of the novel
The theme is darkness—people who live in darkness.
theme = idea that is unifying or recurrent
DefinitionGenerally this sense of theme means:
a basic idea that underlies what is being said or done — especially in a literary or artistic work
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st usePart 3
Web Links
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