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Thirteen Reasons Why

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
abstract
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
abstract thought
That's what I love about poetry. The more abstract, the better. The stuff where you're not sure what the poet's talking about. You may have an idea, but you can't be sure.
abstract = of a concept or idea not associated with any specific instance
From page 175.4  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4B -, p.175.4
Web Links
anonymous
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
an anonymous author
Mrs. Bradley knew people had a difficult time saying nice things to each other, so she devised a way for us to anonymously say what we felt.
anonymously = without revealing who did it
From page 157  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of anonymous means:
an unknown person, or of an unknown person — such as an unknown author, or donation of an unknown person
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 4A -, p.157
Web Links
avert
3 uses
Any excuse to avert my eyes from the other passengers.
avert = turn away
From page 59.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally avert means:
prevent from happening

or:

turn away or aside — often to turn your eyes away from something
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4A -, p.170.9
Web Links
candid
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
a candid photograph
Candid shots of the student body.
candid = unposed
From page 77.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
unposed — typically said of a photograph
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2B -, p.77.2
Web Links
collide
3 uses
The night I watched two cars collide in a dark intersection.
collide = crash together with violent impact
From page 165.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally collide means:
crash together with violent impact; or come into conflict
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useCncl., p.286.9
Web Links
confront
5 uses
While my original plan called for me to confront you right then and there, I jumped to the side—out of the doorway.
confront = to challenge someone or deal directly with an unpleasant situation with them
From page 167.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally confront means:
to deal directly with an unpleasant situation or person

or:

to challenge someone — often by presenting evidence
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library27 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 4B -, p.191.5
Web Links
descend
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
descend the mountain
A metal ladder descends to the sand.
descends = goes downward
From page 268.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of descend means:
move or slope downward
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7A -, p.268.9
Web Links
divert
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
divert the traffic or funds
This diverted the pain from deep inside his brain, where he couldn't reach it, to a pain outside that he had control over.
diverted = re-routed (moved)
From page 112.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of divert means:
to change the direction of something, or the purpose for which it is used
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3A -, p.112.1
Web Links
factor
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
It was the deciding factor.
I think the deciding factor .... was revenge.†
factor = thing that affects a result or outcome
From page 40.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of factor means:
something that affects a result or outcome
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1B -, p.40.8
Web Links
however
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
However much she tried...
However brief it was, you gave me a chance And I liked the Hannah I met that night.†
however = regardless of how
From page 249.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of however means:
to whatever degree (regardless of how much; or whatever unspecified amount)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4B -, p.180.4
Web Links
interpret
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
her interpretation of the data
You know, I'm not even going to interpret this.†
interpret = explain the meaning of
From page 52.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of interpret means:
to understand or explain something in a particular way — often the meaning or significance of something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1B -, p.51.7
Web Links
meander
1 use
It leads through the front doors and turns into a hallway, which meanders between rows of lockers and classrooms on both sides, finally entering the always-open door to first period.
meanders = a winding or indefinite direction
From page 3.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally meander means:
to move slowly in a winding or indefinite direction — (often said of a river, or path, or conversation)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.3.9
Web Links
nostalgia
1 use
Even some of the digitals do it for nostalgia's sake.
nostalgia = longing for something past
From page 80.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally nostalgia means:
happiness that come with the memory of good times combined with a hint of sadness that those times are over
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2B -, p.80.1
Web Links
optimistic
2 uses
Or I could leave it as an optimist and hope for the best.
optimist = someone who expects the best
From page 127  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally optimistic means:
expecting the best; or focusing on the good part of things
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3B -, p.127
Web Links
pathetic
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
Her pathetic look saddened us.
I'm sorry if this sounds pathetic, but you know it's true.
pathetic = pitiful (arousing pity)
From page 138.1  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3B -, p.138.1
Web Links
perspective
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
Look at it from her perspective
But even when I was late, everyone seemed happy to have me there—to provide the "feminine teen perspective" they called it.
perspective = way of seeing and thinking about things
From page 182.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perspective means:
a particular way of seeing or thinking about things
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4B -, p.182.2
Web Links
relevant
1 use
And when they go through my belongings, they'll probably toss it away thinking a freshman crush has no relevance.
relevance = importance
From page 13.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally relevant means:
relating in a meaningful way to the issue in question
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 1A -, p.13.2
Web Links
ridicule
4 uses
...the point is, when you hold people up for ridicule, you have to take responsibility when other people act on it.
ridicule = mocking (to make fun of them)
From page 53.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally ridicule means:
mock (make fun of); or the language or behavior that does so
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1B -, p.53.4
Web Links
spontaneous
2 uses
So tell me, Tyler, those nights you stood outside my window, was I spontaneous enough for you?
spontaneous = behaving in an instinctive (unplanned) manner
From page 77.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally spontaneous means:
behaving in an instinctive, uninhibited manner

or:

happening naturally (without planning or external force)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 2B -, p.77.4
Web Links
subtle
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a subtle difference or thinker
I'd go to Monet's and write a poem or two. My first few attempts were a bit sad. Not much depth or subtlety. Pretty straightforward.
subtlety = things that are not stated directly, but can be understood by someone with adequate sensitivity and relevant knowledge
From page 176.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of subtle means:
not obvious, but understandable by someone with adequate sensitivity and relevant knowledge (perhaps depending upon fine distinctions)

or:

capable of understanding things that require sensitivity and relevant knowledge (perhaps understanding fine distinctions)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4B -, p.176.8
Web Links
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