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The Most Dangerous Game

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
abrupt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
an abrupt change
An abrupt sound startled him.
abrupt = sudden and unexpected
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
agile
1 use
Even as he touched it, the general sensed his danger and leaped back with the agility of an ape.
agility = ability to move well quickly and easily
DefinitionGenerally agile means:
able to move well quickly and easily

or:

able to think well quickly and easily
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
anguish
1 use
It came out of the darkness, a high, screaming sound, the sound of an animal in an extremity of anguish and terror.
anguish = extreme pain, suffering, or distress
DefinitionGenerally anguish means:
extreme pain, suffering, or distress (of body or mind)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
apprehensive
1 use
An apprehensive night crawled slowly by like a wounded snake, and sleep did not visit Rainsford, although the silence of a dead world was on the jungle.
apprehensive = full of worry over possible misfortune
DefinitionGenerally apprehensive means:
worried over possible misfortune
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
condone
1 use
  "I refuse to believe that so modern and civilized a young man as you seem to be harbors romantic ideas about the value of human life. Surely your experiences in the war —" He stopped.
  "Did not make me condone cold-blooded murder," finished Rainsford stiffly.
condone = accept without criticism; or approve of
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
cunning
1 use
I started for the Amazon to hunt jaguars, for I had heard they were unusually cunning.
cunning = cleverness and deceptive
DefinitionGenerally this sense of cunning means:
being good at achieving goals through cleverness — and typically through deception as well (tricking others)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
deliberate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a deliberate thinker
...he swam in that direction, swimming with slow, deliberate strokes, conserving his strength.
deliberate = done with care — often slowly
DefinitionGenerally this sense of deliberate means:
done with great care — often slowly
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
elude
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
she eluded the police
If my quarry eludes me for three whole days, he wins the game.
eludes = avoids (gets away from)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of elude means:
to avoid, or get away from, or remain out of reach
in various senses, including:
  • "She eluded the police."
  • "She eluded danger and finally arrived safely at home."
  • "Success has eluded me."
  • "She always messes up, but some how eludes taking responsibility."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
grave
1 use
All I could get out of him was: 'This place has an evil name among seafaring men, sir.' Then he said to me, very gravely: 'Don't you feel anything?'
gravely = in a serious and solemn manner
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
indolent
1 use
Rainsford, reclining in a steamer chair, indolently puffed on his favorite brier.
indolently = lazily
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
Web Links
invariably
2 uses
...invariably they choose the hunt.
invariably = always
DefinitionGenerally invariably means:
never changing; or always the same
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
nevertheless
1 use
The bed was good and the pajamas of the softest silk, and he was tired in every fiber of his being, but nevertheless Rainsford could not quiet his brain with the opiate of sleep.
nevertheless = in spite of that (used to connect contrasting ideas)
DefinitionGenerally nevertheless means:
in spite of that (Used to connect contrasting ideas. Other synonyms could include words and phrases such as nonetheless, all the same, still,  and however.)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
Web Links
opaque
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
opaque shower door
He was almost on the rocks before he saw them; on a night less calm he would have been shattered against them. With his remaining strength he dragged himself from the swirling waters. Jagged crags appeared to jut up into the opaqueness;
opaqueness = the quality of being impossible to see through (a sky so black it hung like a black blanket that blocked vision of anything beyond it)

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of opaque means:
not able to see through
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
providence
2 uses
Sometimes, when Providence is not so kind, I...
providence = luck; or God's plan
DefinitionGenerally this sense of providence means:
resulting from God's intervention or plan; or lucky — especially with regard to when something happened
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
solicitous
2 uses
He was solicitous about the state of Rainsford's health.
solicitous = showing care or concern for someone
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
specimen
2 uses
About the hall were the mounted heads of many animals — lions, tigers, elephants, moose, bears; larger or more perfect specimens Rainsford had never seen.
specimens = samples representative of their class (in this case,  representative of their species)
DefinitionGenerally specimen means:
a sample regarded as typical of its class; or a bit of tissue, blood, or urine that is taken for diagnostic purposes
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
tangible
2 uses
Sometimes I think evil is a tangible thing — with wave lengths, just as sound and light have.
tangible = a physical presence
DefinitionGenerally tangible means:
capable of being touched, or easily understood so there is no question of its value or reality
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
Web Links
trace   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
found a trace of
A trace of anger was in the general's black eyes, but it was there for but a second, and he said, in his most pleasant manner: "Dear me, what a righteous young man you are! I assure you I do not do the thing you suggest."
trace = small quantity or indication
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
a small quantity; or any indication or evidence of
The exact meaning of this sense of trace depends upon its context. For example:
  • a small indication that something was present — as in "The plane disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean without leaving a trace."
  • a very small amount of something — as in "The blood test showed a trace of steroids."
  • any evidence of something — as in "We did not find a trace of the gene."
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
trace the origin or development
Even so zealous a hunter as General Zaroff could not trace him there, he told himself; only the devil himself could follow that complicated trail through the jungle after dark.
trace = find (by following indications of where he had been)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
to find, search, research, or keep track of
This sense of trace usually has to do with information. It's specific meaning depends on its context. For example:
to find or search for something through investigation — often the origin of something:
  • "The police traced the call." — found out where it originated
  • "We are tracing the lost luggage" — searching for
  • "Can you trace the problem to its source?" — find through investigation
  • "She traced her family history to discover that her great-grandmother came to the United States from Lithuania when the Nazis occupied it." — discovered something through investigation
to research or report on the development of something
  • "She traced the history of the automobile in her paper." — researched the development of something
  • "Her presentation traced recent progress in alternative energy solutions." — reported on
to monitor or keep track of the progress or development of something
  • "She traces the progress of at-risk students." — monitors information
  • "I used binoculars to trace her progress up the mountain." — monitor, follow, or track
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
venerable
1 use
He filled Rainsford's glass with venerable Chablis from a dusty bottle.
venerable = excellent (worthy of respect and admiration)
DefinitionGenerally venerable means:
respected (worthy of respect) — typically because of age or position
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
Web Links
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