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The Women of Brewster Place

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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agitate
1 use
The assault on the police officer would be a bit sticky, but the court was certain to suspend the sentence when it was argued that the defendant was in an unduly agitated state of mind.†
agitated = not calm; or stirred up (often emotionally)
From page 47.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally agitate means:
to stir up or shake — emotionally (as when people are angered or upset) or physically (as when a washing machine cleans clothes)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1, p.47.7
Web Links
begrudge
2 uses
Cora looked begrudgingly at the flyer.†
begrudgingly = in a resentful manner; or giving unwillingly
From page 119  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally begrudge means:
to resent (feel bitterness—usually over unfairness); or to give unwillingly
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.119
Web Links
bewilder
5 uses
Sergeant Manchester massaged the tightness between his sleepy eyes and looked wearily at the desperate bewilderment that stood in front of him.†
bewilderment = a feeling of extreme confusion
From page 46.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally bewilder means:
to confuse someone
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library17 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.46.6
Web Links
consequence
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a direct consequence of
Consequently, , no one ever knew why Ben drank.†
consequently = resultantly (as a result)
From page 3.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
a result of something (often an undesired side effect)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library28 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useDawn, p.3.9
Web Links
distort
5 uses
He wanted to kill the man who had sneaked into his home and distorted the faith and trust he had in his child.†
distorted = altered in an unnatural or untrue way
From page 23.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally distort means:
to alter something in an unnatural or untrue way
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1, p.23.3
Web Links
eulogy
2 uses
She intoned the words as if she were reciting a eulogy.†
eulogy = formal expression of praise — typically speeches delivered at someone's funeral
From page 67.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally eulogy means:
a formal expression of praise — typically a speech given at someone's funeral
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.67.9
Web Links
forfeit
1 use
If they don't appear, the court issues a bench warrant for the truant party and you forfeit your bond.
forfeit = lose
From page 50.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally forfeit means:
to lose or surrender something — often as a penalty
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.50.2
Web Links
indignant
3 uses
Kiswana threw her shoulders back and unsuccessfully tried to disguise her embarrassment with indignation.†
indignation = anger or annoyance at something unjust or wrong

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 79.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally indignant means:
angered or annoyed at something unjust or wrong
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3, p.79.3
Web Links
malicious
1 use
She poured the dirty water off the rice to destroy and silence them, then watched with a malicious joy as they disappeared down the drain.†
malicious = wanting to see others suffer; or threatening evil
From page 94.2  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4, p.94.2
Web Links
minute   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
minute size
But the glass splinters found some minute, untouched place—as they always did—and tore the heart and let the whistling in.†
minute = small
From page 149.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minute means:
small, exceptionally small, or insignificant
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.149.9
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
keep the minutes
Now we need someone else to take the minutes.†
minutes = formal notes
From page 143.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minutes means:
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.143.6
Web Links
monologue
4 uses
The voice droned on in its practiced monologue, peppered with sterile kindness.†
monologue = a long uninterrupted speech
From page 95.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally monologue means:
a (usually long) dramatic speech by a single actor

or:

a long speech by one person — especially one that prevents others from talking

or:

a continuous series of jokes and stories by a single comedian
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.139.4
Web Links
nurture
4 uses
And she had watched and coaxed and nurtured the greenery about her.†
nurtured = helped to develop or grow
From page 43.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally nurture means:
help develop or grow
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.25.2
Web Links
persistent
4 uses
It never ended—someone's somebody—all persistently filed in to bruise their heads upon the rigid walls of due process.†
persistently = in a continuing manner — especially despite difficulties or opposition
From page 46.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally persistent means:
continuing — especially despite difficulties or opposition
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1, p.46.8
Web Links
protrude
4 uses
Cora said, sitting on the steps with her hands resting on her protruding stomach.†
protruding = sticking out
From page 181.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally protrude means:
to stick out from
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.82.1
Web Links
relevant
1 use
It didn't matter if they often repeated what had been said or if their monologues held no relevance to the issues; each one fought for the space to outshine the other.†
relevance = importance (meaningful relation to the issue in question)
From page 139.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally relevant means:
relating in a meaningful way to the issue in question
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 6, p.139.4
Web Links
revolution
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
the computer revolution
Where are all those black revolutionaries who were shouting and demonstrating and kicking up a lot of dust with you on that campus?†
revolutionaries = supporters of dramatic change — sometimes people fighting for overthrow of a government
From page 83.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of revolution means:
dramatic change — sometimes violent overthrow of a government
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library17 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3, p.83.9
Web Links
scorn
1 use
Mattie laughed and openly scorned his foolish antics while inwardly admitting that he had to be considered attractive by many women.†
scorned = disrespected or rejected
From page 41.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally scorn means:
disrespect or reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1, p.41.8
Web Links
Shakespeare
7 uses
This stuff here—Shakespeare and all that.†
Shakespeare = author widely regarded as the greatest in the English language and whose works include Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet
From page 119.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of Shakespeare means:
English dramatist and poet frequently cited as the greatest writer in the English language and who wrote such works as Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet (1564-1616)
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.119.3
Web Links
vary
1 use
Huge papier-maché flora hung in varying shades of green splendor among sequin-dusted branches and rocks.†
varying = differing; or changing
From page 125  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally vary means:
to be different, or to change
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 5, p.125
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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