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When the Legends Die

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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appropriate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
appropriate from their culture
When they had eaten, Red appropriated the herder's hat,
appropriated = took
DefinitionGenerally this sense of appropriate means:
to take without asking — often without right
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 26
Web Links
arid
2 uses
the arid flatlands
arid = lacking sufficient water or rainfall
DefinitionGenerally arid means:
lacking sufficient water or rainfall

or:

lacking vitality or spirit
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
arrogant
2 uses
He was arrogant and defensive at the restaurant,
arrogant = having an excessive sense of superiority
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
clamor
2 uses
It tried to buck once more and failed. The crowd was clamoring.
clamoring = demanding loudly and/or persistently
DefinitionGenerally clamor means:
loud noise and/or persistent demands — especially from human voice
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
convention
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
conventional behavior
He swung into the saddle on the sorrel, a conventional saddle with a horn.
conventional = normal or typical
DefinitionGenerally this sense of convention means:
something regarded as normal or typical
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
deliberate   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
deliberate insult
But Red ordered him to lose and he made that one mistake, made it deliberately, and got thrown.
deliberately = intentionally
DefinitionGenerally this sense of deliberate means:
to do something intentionally (do it on purpose)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
a deliberate thinker
Tom dismounted carefully, each motion deliberate.
deliberate = done with great care — often slowly
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
deride
3 uses
He laughed at that, a snorting laugh of derision.
derision = treatment as inferior and unworthy of respect

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
diabolical
1 use
He was a kind of elemental force, a primitive scourge and a raw challenge that summoned diabolic violence from every horse he rode.
diabolic = devilish
DefinitionGenerally diabolical means:
evil; very bad; or cruel and clever (like something of the devil)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34
Web Links
dubious
1 use
Luther looked at Thomas, dubious, but he said, "Yes."
dubious = doubtful or suspicious
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
indignant
1 use
Instead, she took the chair and left the room, bristling with indignation.
indignation = anger or annoyance at something unjust or wrong

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally indignant means:
angered or annoyed at something unjust or wrong
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 40
Web Links
listless
2 uses
His hands lay listless.
listless = lacking energy
DefinitionGenerally listless means:
lacking energy and normal enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
persist
3 uses
even with the sheep gone their smell persisted.
persisted = continued
DefinitionGenerally persist means:
to continue — often despite difficulty
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 32
Web Links
rancid
1 use
Albert Left Hand was a short, fat man who smelled of rancid mutton tallow.
rancid = rotting (smelling bad)
DefinitionGenerally rancid means:
bad — most directly referring to the smell of oils or fats that have decomposed because they are not fresh enough, but metaphorically the word can refer to anything considered bad
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
recluse
1 use
He stopped drinking, became more of a recluse than ever, and rode with cold and ruthless fury.
recluse = someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34
Web Links
rein
63 uses
He reined the horse around
reined = forced (the horse) in a direction by pulling on straps that are attached to the bit in its mouth

(editor's note:  Reined is also used outside the context of horses to indicate that something is "restrained or controlled".)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of rein means:
to restrain or control; or a means of control
The meaning of rein depends upon its context. For example:
  • "keep a tight rein on the new employee," or "rein in a horse" — to control or restrain
  • "give the new employee free rein," or "give the horse full rein" — do not restrain
  • "the reins of government" — means of control
  • "the reins of the horse" — leather straps used with a bit to control a horse (You might like to think of other senses of rein as being figurative derivations from this sense.)
Word Statistics
Book63 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 43
Web Links
solicitous
2 uses
She was the most skillful of the nurses, the most solicitous and helpful, the most friendly.
solicitous = showing care or concern for someone
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 39
Web Links
speculate
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
don't know, but I'll speculate
The doctor looked at him, speculating. "I'd think you'd want to settle down."
speculating = guessing (thinking aloud)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of speculate means:
to think about, wonder, guess or theorize with much uncertainty
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 32
Web Links
tentative
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
said it tentatively
His legs were weak and his hip joints stiff and painful, but he took a few tentative steps, holding to the window frames.
tentative = careful or unsure
DefinitionGenerally this sense of tentative means:
done in a careful or unsure way (indicating a lack of confidence in exactly what will happen)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 40
Web Links
wither
3 uses
He could see Meo's garden patch, weedy but still with the mark of Meo's hand upon it, withering in the searing heat.
withering = shriveling (wrinkling from lack of water)
DefinitionGenerally wither means:
to shrivel (wrinkle and contract — usually from lack of water)

or:

to become weaker; or feel humiliated
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 49
Web Links
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