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Watership Down

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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accord
8 uses
1  —8 uses as in:
done of her own accord
Hazel went out of his own accord, to distract their attention while we got away.
own accord = own mind (voluntarily without anyone asking)
From page 223.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
mind
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.63.5
Web Links
approach
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
approached the city
Here, he grasped at once the best way to approach the beech hanger without being seen or smelled.†
approach = get near
From page 417.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to get closer to (near in space, time, quantity, or quality)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library104 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3, p.303.5
Web Links
attribute
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
I attribute it to...
Their reluctance to come closer could be attributed to Bigwig: but they would not go away.
attributed = credited (pointed to as the cause of something)
From page 219.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of attribute means:
to credit (a source for something)
in two typical senses:
  • "I attribute it to her work." — to say who or what made something happen
  • "Remember to attribute any quotations in your paper." — indicate the source of a quotation or idea
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 2, p.219.7
Web Links
banish
1 use
El-ahrairah knew that Prince Rainbow meant that if he caught him stealing the carrots he would either kill him or else banish him and put some other rabbit over his people: and the thought that the other rabbit would probably be Hufsa made him grind his teeth.†
banish = expel or get rid of
From page 169.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally banish means:
to expel or get rid of
in various senses, including:
  • to force someone to leave a country as punishment
  • to push an idea from the mind
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.169.9
Web Links
buoyant   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
buoyant force or market
A batsman who has played a fine innings will say afterward that he felt he could not miss the ball, and a speaker or an actor, on his lucky day, can sense his audience carrying him as though he were swimming in miraculous, buoyant water.
buoyant = with a tendency to cause things in it to float
From page 199.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of buoyant means:
tending to float or rise; or making other things float
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.199.9
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
buoyant personality
There was a shrewd, buoyant air about him as he sat up, looked round and rubbed both front paws over his nose.
buoyant = cheerful and optimistic
From page 4.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of buoyant means:
characterized by cheerfulness and optimism; or a tendency to maintain or quickly recover cheerfulness and optimism after setbacks
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.4.5
Web Links
content
9 uses
There's a great deal of discontent, you know.
discontent = dissatisfaction

(Editor's note:  The prefix "dis-" in discontent means not or opposite. It reverses the meaning of content as seen in words like disagree, disconnect, and disappear.)
From page 328.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of content means:
satisfied
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library54 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 4, p.395.3
Web Links
contrast
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
there is a contrast
The head was very dark brown—almost black—in such sharp contrast to the white neck that the bird looked as though it were wearing a kind of hood.†
contrast = difference (in brightness or tone)
From page 180.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
a difference — especially a notable difference; or the side-x-side arrangement of things that draws attention to an unmissable difference
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 2, p.180.3
Web Links
culvert
8 uses
They ran over the culvert.
culvert = an enclosed channel that carries runoff water beneath something
From page 6.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally culvert means:
a pipe or other enclosed channel that carries runoff water beneath a road, railroad, or sidewalk
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 4, p.374
Web Links
cunning
22 uses
Be cunning and full of tricks and your people shall never be destroyed.
cunning = clever and deceptive
From page 29.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of cunning means:
being good at achieving goals through cleverness — and typically through deception as well (tricking others)
Word Statistics
Book22 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.27.6
Web Links
fidget
10 uses
The two rabbits waited in silence, broken only by the continual nervous fidgeting of Fiver.
fidgeting = making of small restless movements
From page 10.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally fidget means:
to make small restless movements
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.10.5
Web Links
forage
12 uses
Oh, I went foraging down the hill.
foraging = searching for and gathering food
From page 206.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally forage means:
to search for and gather — often food and provisions
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.161.4
Web Links
grave
2 uses
Overcrowding was becoming a grave problem, and this despite the fact that many of the does were re-absorbing their litters before birth.†
grave = serious and solemn
From page 307.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePart 1, p.66.3
Web Links
minute
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
minute size
In a few seconds the ground was covered with water and over it, to a height of inches, rose a haze formed of a myriad minute splashes.†
minute = small
From page 359.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minute means:
small, exceptionally small, or insignificant
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2, p.131.4
Web Links
nevertheless
12 uses
Nevertheless, he did not seem aggressive.†
nevertheless = in spite of that (used to connect contrasting ideas)
From page 63.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally nevertheless means:
in spite of that (Used to connect contrasting ideas. Other synonyms could include words and phrases such as nonetheless, all the same, still,  and however.)
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 1, p.58
Web Links
novel
1 use
Pipkin and Blackberry were waking, more at the stamping than the voice, which was thin and novel, not striking through their sleep to any deep instinct.†
novel = new and original
From page 83  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of novel means:
new and original — typically something considered good
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st usePart 1, p.83
Web Links
obscure
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
it obscured my view
...the sun entered the world in smooth, gigantic power. Nothing interrupted or obscured its coming.
obscured = made less visible
From page 179.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st usePart 2, p.179.2
Web Links
perplex
11 uses
The rabbits were perplexed.
perplexed = confused or puzzled
From page 133.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally perplex means:
to confuse
Word Statistics
Book11 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.63.9
Web Links
sentry
76 uses
His soldiers were very fierce and his lettuce garden was surrounded by a deep ditch and guarded by a thousand sentries day and night.
sentries = people standing guard
From page 94.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally sentry means:
someone who stands guard
Word Statistics
Book76 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.94.4
Web Links
twilight
17 uses
1  —17 uses as in:
pink clouds in a twilight sky
"Hazel?" said Bigwig, sniffing at him in the deep twilight among the tree roots.
twilight = the light at the time of day between daylight and darkness
From page 10.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of twilight means:
the time of day between daylight and darkness (just after sunset or just before sunrise); or the light from the sky at that time
Word Statistics
Book17 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1, p.3.7
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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