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Seventeenth Summer

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
apathy
1 use
we were sitting around the table in a contented, Sunday-afternoon apathy,
apathy = lack of enthusiasm
DefinitionGenerally apathy means:
lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useJune
Web Links
benevolent
3 uses
"Well," answered my mother benevolently, "I don't see as that makes much difference. Having no folks of his own in town to spend the holiday with, he might as well come along with us."
benevolently = with kindness or generosity
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useJuly
Web Links
coherent
1 use
I could hear my thoughts brushing past each other in my head, none of them coherent enough to be spoken.
coherent = sensible (reasonable)
DefinitionGenerally coherent means:
sensible and clear; or describing parts as fitting together in a consistent or pleasing manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useJune
Web Links
condescending
2 uses
"Of course," Lorraine went on with pointed condescension, "that depends on whether you're a genius or not."
condescension = treating others as inferiors

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally condescending means:
treating others as inferior; or doing something considered beneath one's position or dignity
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useJune
Web Links
deride
1 use
Margie sniffed in derision.
derision = as though her surroundings were unworthy of respect

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAugu
Web Links
disdain
1 use
My whole mind was filled with a growing disdain and loathing.
disdain = a lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useJuly
Web Links
dubious
1 use
a small chocolate cake with chocolate frosting, sprinkled with very dubious chopped nuts.
dubious = doubtful (of questionable quality)
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useJune
Web Links
elaborate
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
an elaborate wink
They are the more popular crowd at high school and every evening about half-past seven they gather to stand talking together with elaborate unconcern, while in actuality they are sharply watching the cars going by to see what fellows and girls are out together; they watch to see who is having a Coke with whom and to report any violations on the part of the girls who are supposed to be going steady.
elaborate = exaggerated
DefinitionGenerally this sense of elaborate means:
to exaggerate an action
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useJune
Web Links
elated
1 use
When he hung up I went out into the garden and could hardly keep the elation out of my voice as I said to my mother, "Tony Becker just called me."
elation = happiness and excitement

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally elated means:
full of happiness and excitement
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useJune
Web Links
exasperated
3 uses
It was my turn to sound exasperated, but inside my head words were bumping together so fast that I didn't know what to say.
exasperated = greatly annoyed
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useJuly
Web Links
incredulous
2 uses
"A Coke ..." he began incredulously...
incredulously = with disbelief; or with difficulty accepting something so unexpected
DefinitionGenerally incredulous means:
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useJuly
Web Links
listless
4 uses
His thoughts must have dragged as slowly and listlessly as mine with the same painful dullness.
listlessly = with a lack of energy and normal enthusiasm
DefinitionGenerally listless means:
lacking energy and normal enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useJune
Web Links
muse
6 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
her musings
We mused over the thought for a while and soon the quiet stretched into long minutes
mused = reflected (thought) deeply on a subject
DefinitionGenerally this sense of muse means:
reflect (think) deeply on a subject — perhaps aloud
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useJuly
Web Links
ominous
2 uses
Late the next afternoon all the ominous, heavy gloom I felt inside of me seemed to come out in the weather.
ominous = threatening, suggestive of, or foreshadowing bad things to come
DefinitionGenerally ominous means:
threatening (suggestive of, or foreshadowing bad things to come)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useJune
Web Links
parched
3 uses
The grass on the side lawn was parched brown with irregular scallops of green where the shade of the trees shadowed the ground.
parched = dried out by heat or excessive exposure to sunlight
DefinitionGenerally parched means:
dried out by heat or excessive exposure to sunlight; or very thirsty
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useJuly
Web Links
petulant
3 uses
Dollie sat down backwards suddenly with her legs sprawled in front of her and cried with a petulantly accusing voice, "Johnnie, you pushed me on purpose!" and everyone laughed.
petulantly = unreasonably annoyed or upset
DefinitionGenerally petulant means:
unreasonably annoyed or upset

or:

easily annoyed or upset
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useJune
Web Links
poignant
2 uses
The music seemed to fill the whole room at Pete's with its poignant tilt,
poignant = sharp or intense
DefinitionGenerally poignant means:
sharp or intense — typically arousing deep emotion such as sadness, but possibly having or creating a sharp smell, taste, or insight
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useJune
Web Links
reproach
1 use
And there was no reproach in her voice.
reproach = criticism
DefinitionGenerally reproach means:
a criticism; or to express criticism — especially where a relationship makes the disapproval result in disappointment or shame
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useJune
Web Links
revere
1 use
The very air of a church inspires reverence,
reverence = feelings of deep respect, awe, and wonder
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useJune
Web Links
tangible
3 uses
It seemed as if I were drinking in the almost tangible pleasure of the morning like a rich, heavy malted milk that comes slow and thick through the straws.
tangible = capable of being touched
DefinitionGenerally tangible means:
capable of being touched, or easily understood so there is no question of its value or reality
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useJune
Web Links
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