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Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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appropriate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
it is appropriate
exactly the appropriate feeling in the circumstances
appropriate = suitable (or fitting)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of appropriate means:
suitable (fitting) for a particular situation
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library28 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 6.
Web Links
arrogant
2 uses
It was all so...arrogant.†
arrogant = having an excessive sense of superiority
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15.
Web Links
auspicious
1 use
"That would be very auspicious," said Ataba.
auspicious = favorable; or suggestive of good things to come
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6.
Web Links
divine
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
to forgive is divine
ready for the responsibility that has been thrust upon us by divine Providence
divine = coming from God
DefinitionGenerally this sense of divine means:
wonderful; or god-like or coming from God
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15.
Web Links
doctrine
2 uses
"And someone, please, to teach us doctrine," Mau added.†
doctrine = a belief (or system of beliefs or principles) accepted as authoritative by some group
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 15.
Web Links
grave
2 uses
"Could be, sir," said the captain gravely.†
gravely = in a serious and solemn manner
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7.
Web Links
indulge
1 use
I bet you could do with a bit o' civilized company, such as might be provided by a pair of gentlemen such as us—well, I say us, but o' course Mr. Polegrave here does indulge in the questionable habit o' wiping his boogers on his sleeve, but bishops have been known to do worse."†
indulge = enjoy to excess
DefinitionGenerally indulge means:
to give into a desire or enjoy something — especially in excess of what is thought good—such as a desire to eat too much cake, or be too lazy

or:

to allow or help someone to get their way or enjoy something — especially something that (probably because of excess) is not considered to be good or proper
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 10.
Web Links
inquiry
1 use
He believed in rational thinking and scientific inquiry, which was why he never won an argument with his mother, who believed in people doing what she told them, and believed it with a rock-hard certainty that dismissed all opposition.†
inquiry = questioning or investigating
DefinitionGenerally inquiry means:
the act of asking a question or performing an investigation
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4.
Web Links
nevertheless
3 uses
Nevertheless, I forbid—†
nevertheless = in spite of that (used to connect contrasting ideas)
DefinitionGenerally nevertheless means:
in spite of that (Used to connect contrasting ideas. Other synonyms could include words and phrases such as nonetheless, all the same, still,  and however.)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3.
Web Links
optimistic
1 use
Some of them even fluttered over and perched on the canoe itself, huddling together and staring at him with a sort of desperate, terrified optimism.†
optimism = a tendency to expect and see the best in all things
DefinitionGenerally optimistic means:
expecting the best; or focusing on the good part of things
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.
Web Links
perish
1 use
* She'd never heard this piece read down at Holy Trinity, but she had tucked it into her memory and now it came out, screamed like a battle cry: "And those that perish in the sea, the sea shall not hold them!†
perish = die, be destroyed, or cease to exist
DefinitionGenerally perish means:
to die — especially in an unnatural way

or:

to be destroyed or cease to exist
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 8.
Web Links
phenomenon
1 use
It is in fact set in a parallel universe, a phenomenon known only to advanced physicists and anyone who has ever watched any episode of any SF series, anywhere.†
phenomenon = something that exists or happened — often of special interest
DefinitionGenerally phenomenon means:
something that exists or happened — especially something of special interest — sometimes someone or something that is extraordinary
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useA.N.
Web Links
privation
2 uses
"Dear, I think the privations of your time on this island may have affected you in some way—" His Excellency began.
privations = things that are lacking which are needed to live in a satisfactory manner
DefinitionGenerally privation means:
lack of basic things needed to live in a satisfactory manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15.
Web Links
ratify
3 uses
We may declare the succession overseas—even crown the man if necessary—but his presence will be required on English soil within the time period for full ratification.
ratification = formal approval

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally ratify means:
to approve — typically the formal approval of an agreement by an organization
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.
Web Links
resignation
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
submitted her resignation
I am a princess now. ... And I don't think it's the kind of thing you can resign from!
resign = quit
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
to quit — especially a job or position; or a document expressing such an act
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 15.
Web Links
scorn
2 uses
You scorned them and spurned them, but the faster you ran from them, the closer you came to them.†
scorned = disrespected or rejected
DefinitionGenerally scorn means:
disrespect or reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 10.
Web Links
scrutiny
1 use
"And this happened weeks ago!" said Mr. Red, who had been scrutinizing the penciled message.†
scrutinizing = looking at very carefully

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word to a verb. This is the same pattern you see in words like apologize, theorize, and dramatize.)
DefinitionGenerally scrutiny means:
careful examination of something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7.
Web Links
species
2 uses
She listened intently at his ears and lifted each of his legs in turn, watching the twitching as closely as if she was observing a new species of wild animal.†
species = a similar group of animals or plants
DefinitionGenerally species means:
a group of animals or plants that are similar — typically identified as a group because they can procreate together (reproduce new members of the group)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 8.
Web Links
tact
4 uses
They would be elegant and tactful.†
tactful = to say or handle things in a way that makes others feel good about them
DefinitionGenerally tact means:
the ability or act of saying or handling things in such a way that others feel good about them
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 15.
Web Links
wretched
5 uses
My mother made me a little shepherdess outfit, and I looked so sweet it would make you sick, and the wretched creature used to take every opportunity to butt me in the—to butt me.†
wretched = miserable or very bad
DefinitionGenerally wretched means:
very bad
in various senses, including:
  • unfortunate or miserable — as in "wretched prisoners sleeping on the cold floor"
  • of poor quality — as in "wretched roads"
  • morally bad — as in "The wretched woman stole his wallet."
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5.
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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