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Good Country People

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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assert
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
asserted her opinion that...
Science, on the other hand, has to assert its soberness and seriousness afresh and declare that it is concerned solely with what-is.
assert = say (that something is true)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of assert means:
to say that something is true — especially something disputed
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
Web Links
contempt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
feels contempt towards her
The girl gave him a contemptuous look...
contemptuous = showing a lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
dogged
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
dogged determination
The boy's look was irritated but dogged.
dogged = persistent
DefinitionGenerally this sense of dogged means:
continuing effort to achieve something despite difficulties (persistent)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
earnest
2 uses
He paused and gave her a straight earnest look and said, "Lady, I've come to speak of serious things."
earnest = sincere or serious
DefinitionGenerally earnest means:
characterized by sincere belief

or:

intensely or excessively serious
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
Web Links
gaunt
1 use
He was a tall gaunt hatless youth who had called yesterday to sell them a Bible.
gaunt = very thin and bony
DefinitionGenerally gaunt means:
very thin and bony — often from hunger or as though having been worn to the bone
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
implication
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
the implication is that...
She had started thinking of it as a great joke and then she had begun to see profound implications in it.
implications = consequences or results
DefinitionGenerally this sense of implication means:
Something that follows from something else.
The thing that follows could be:
  • something suggested indirectly (not said directly)
  • something that can be concluded (often a logical consequence)
  • something that results from something else
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
inclined
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
I'm inclined to
...showed an inclination to leave.
inclination = desire (an attitude of mind favoring)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of inclined means:
a tendency, mood, desire, or attitude that favors something; or making someone favor something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
Web Links
indignant
1 use
"I hope you don't think," he said in a lofty indignant tone, "that I believe in that crap!"
indignant = angered or annoyed at something unjust or wrong
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
Web Links
insistent
1 use
She would make these statements, usually at the table, in a tone of gentle insistence as if no one held them but her,
insistence = persistence (repeating the statements in a manner that demands a response)
DefinitionGenerally insistent means:
persistent or continuing or firm — especially in maintaining a view or demanding something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
literally
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
literally--not figuratively
Hulga had heard Mrs. Hopewell give her the details of the hunting accident, how the leg had been literally blasted off, how she had never lost consciousness.
literally = actually (not figuratively; not an exaggeration)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of literally means:
actually true using the basic meaning of the words (not an exaggeration, metaphor, or other type of figurative speech)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
perceive
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
though blind, can perceive light
She could perceive her mother's eye on her.
perceive = see
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perceive means:
to become aware of — especially by using the senses (to see, hear, smell, feel, or taste)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
presumption
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
presumption of innocence
She had a vision of the name working like the ugly sweating Vulcan who stayed in the furnace and to whom, presumably, the goddess had to come when called.
presumably = probably

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-ably" is a combination of the suffixes "-able" and "-ly". It means in a manner that is capable of being. This is the same pattern you see in words like agreeably, favorably, and comfortably.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of presumption means:
to think of something as true or likely, even though it is not known with certainty
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
profound
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
profound idea
...she had begun to see profound implications in it.
profound = deep or far reaching
DefinitionGenerally this sense of profound means:
deep or far-reaching in intellect or consequence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
prominent
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a prominent jaw
He had prominent face bones and a streak of stickylooking brown hair falling across his forehead.
prominent = protruding (sticking out)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of prominent means:
sticking out and easily noticed
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
remorse
2 uses
She imagined that she took his remorse in hand and changed it into a deeper understanding of life.
remorse = regret for doing something that was wrong
DefinitionGenerally remorse means:
a feeling of deep regret for doing something that was wrong
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
retract
1 use
...it was not often necessary for her to retract a statement, but when she did...
retract = take back (something said)
DefinitionGenerally retract means:
to take back; or to move back or in
in various senses, including:
  • to take back something previously said — such as a promise or opinion
  • to move back or in — such as an airplane's landing gear, or pulling your hand back after being burned
  • in surgery, the use of a medical instrument to draw skin or an organ back out of the way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
revere
2 uses
The boy's face and his voice were entirely reverent as he uncovered it and said, "Now show me how to take it off and on."
reverent = with feelings of deep respect and admiration
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
seduce
3 uses
She had seduced him without even making up her mind to try.
seduced = enticed to fall in love
DefinitionGenerally seduce means:
to persuade someone to do something by tempting them with something pleasurable or desired — often to make them want to have sex
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
sober
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a sobering thought
and he laughed again and then all at once his face sobered completely.
sobered = became serious
DefinitionGenerally this sense of sobering means:
serious; or making one serious or calm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
sullen
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a sullen mood
Mrs. Freeman would take on strange resentments and for days together she would be sullen but the source of her displeasure was always obscure;
sullen = showing a gloomy or bad mood
DefinitionGenerally this sense of sullen means:
being unhappy and withdrawn
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
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