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Mrs. Warren's Profession

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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allude
1 use
The incidents of sex which they contain, though carried in both to the extreme point at which another step would be dealt with, not by the King's Reader, but by the police, do not involve adultery, nor any allusion to Mrs Warren's profession, nor to the fact that the children of any polyandrous group will, when they grow up, inevitably be confronted, as those of Mrs Warren's group are in my play, with the insoluble problem of their own possible consanguinity.†
allusion = an indirect reference

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally allude means:
to make an indirect reference
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useAuth
Web Links
alternative
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
an alternative plan
For the alternatives offered are not morality and immorality, but two sorts of immorality.†
alternatives = possibilities
DefinitionGenerally this sense of alternative means:
something available as another possibility
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useAuth
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
your candid opinion
Accordingly, I find one critic so explicit as to the nature of his disappointment as to say candidly that "such airy talk as there is upon the matter is utterly unworthy of acceptance as being a representation of what people with blood in them think or do on such occasions."†
candidly = with honesty and directness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useAuth
Web Links
censor
26 uses
The managers of our London music-halls are not subject to any censorship.†
censorship = the act of removing or suppressing anything considered obscene, immoral, or politically unacceptable
DefinitionGenerally this sense of censor means:
to remove or suppress anything considered obscene, immoral, or politically unacceptable

or:

a person who does such suppression
Word Statistics
Book26 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAuth
Web Links
consequence
12 uses
1  —12 uses as in:
a direct consequence of
Consequently the first condition of progress is the removal of censorships.†
consequently = resultantly (as a result)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
a result of something (often an undesired side effect)
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library28 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useAuth
Web Links
contempt
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
feels contempt towards her
CROFTS [contemptuously] Yah!†
contemptuously = with disrespect
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAct 2
Web Links
convention
14 uses
1  —14 uses as in:
conventional behavior
You are a conventional woman at heart.
conventional = typical
DefinitionGenerally this sense of convention means:
something regarded as normal or typical
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useAct 1
Web Links
convey
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
convey title to the property
I shall set up chambers in the City, and work at actuarial calculations and conveyancing.†
conveyancing = legal transferring of title
DefinitionGenerally this sense of convey means:
to give or transfer — especially legal title
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useAct 1
Web Links
disparage
2 uses
FRANK [looking round disparagingly] Do you intend to stick in this confounded place?†
disparagingly = with criticism or in a manner that makes something seem less important
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useAuth
Web Links
grave
4 uses
Praed, with a grave shake of his head, walks up the garden with his hands behind his back.†
grave = serious and solemn
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useAct 1
Web Links
illustrate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
as illustrated by this example
The editor, confronted with the two stories given above, threw his pledge to the winds, and, instead of returning the article, printed it with the illustrative examples omitted, and nothing left but the argument from political principles against the Censorship.†
illustrative = serving to help explain or demonstrate something

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of illustrate means:
to help make clear — typically by example
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useAuth
Web Links
intellectual
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
intellectual stimulation
I now come to those critics who, intellectually baffled by the problem in Mrs Warren's Profession, have made a virtue of running away from it.†
intellectually = in a manner that relates to intelligence
DefinitionGenerally this sense of intellectual means:
related to intelligence — such as requiring, appealing to, or possessing intelligence
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAuth
obsolete
1 use
Really he is that obsolescent phenomenon the fool of the family dumped on the Church by his father the patron, clamorously asserting himself as father and clergyman without being able to command respect in either capacity.†
obsolescent = becoming outdated
DefinitionGenerally obsolete means:
no longer in general use because it was replaced by something better
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useAct 1
Web Links
omit
1 use
The editor, confronted with the two stories given above, threw his pledge to the winds, and, instead of returning the article, printed it with the illustrative examples omitted, and nothing left but the argument from political principles against the Censorship.†
omitted = to exclude or neglect something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useAuth
Web Links
opera
5 uses
The attempt to produce a genus of opera without music (and this absurdity is what our fashionable theatres have been driving at for a long time without knowing it) is far less hopeful than my own determination to accept problem as the normal materiel of the drama.†
opera = a musical play with orchestra in which most of the dialogue is sung (or the art form that consists of such musicals; or describing something as related to that art form)
DefinitionGenerally opera means:
a musical play with orchestra in which most dialogue is sung — (typically associated with classical music and often in a language foreign to the audience)

or:

the art form (or describing something as related to it) that consists of musical plays with orchestra in which most dialogue is sung
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAuth
Web Links
phenomenon
1 use
Really he is that obsolescent phenomenon the fool of the family dumped on the Church by his father the patron, clamorously asserting himself as father and clergyman without being able to command respect in either capacity.†
phenomenon = something that exists or happened — often of special interest
DefinitionGenerally phenomenon means:
something that exists or happened — especially something of special interest — sometimes someone or something that is extraordinary
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useAct 1
Web Links
primarily
1 use
Thus it comes about that the more completely the dramatist is emancipated from the illusion that men and women are primarily reasonable beings, and the more powerfully he insists on the ruthless indifference of their great dramatic antagonist, the external world, to their whims and emotions, the surer he is to be denounced as blind to the very distinction on which his whole work is built.†
primarily = mainly
DefinitionGenerally primarily means:
mainly (most importantly)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useAuth
Web Links
repudiate
2 uses
PRAED [rising in a frenzy of repudiation] I don't believe it.†
repudiation = strong rejection

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally repudiate means:
strong rejection — especially when the idea or thing being rejected was once embraced
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useAct 3
Web Links
scrupulous
6 uses
If he made his play false to life by inventing fictitious disadvantages for her, he would be acting as unscrupulously as any tract writer.†
unscrupulously = unethically

(editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unscrupulously means not and reverses the meaning of scrupulously. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useAuth
Web Links
sulk
5 uses
MRS WARREN [sulkily] Oh well, yes, if you come to that, I suppose you are.†
sulkily = in an excessively unhappy and unsociable manner
DefinitionGenerally sulk means:
to be overly unhappy and unsociable — often due to disappointment or a sense of not getting what was deserved
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useAct 1
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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