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The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 2

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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acquit
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
she acquitted herself well
Osmond at present acquitted himself very honourably.†
acquitted = handled (conducted or behaved)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of acquit means:
to handle oneself in a specified way — which is typically in a positive way
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
allude
20 uses
And on this the aunt and the niece went to breakfast, where Mrs. Touchett, as good as her word, made no allusion to Gilbert Osmond.†
allusion = an indirect reference

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally allude means:
to make an indirect reference
Word Statistics
Book20 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 38
Web Links
candid
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
your candid opinion
Was the extremity of her candour but the perfection of self-consciousness?†
candour = honesty and directness

(editor's note:  This is a British spelling. Americans use candor.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 32
Web Links
consequence
7 uses
1  —7 uses as in:
a direct consequence of
Henrietta was not in his confidence, though he was in hers, and Isabel consequently received no side-light upon his state of mind.†
consequently = resultantly (as a result)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
a result of something (often an undesired side effect)
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library28 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 45
Web Links
contrary
9 uses
1  —9 uses as in:
on the contrary
On the contrary, to-day, in the train, he seemed particularly well; the idea of our reaching Rome—he's very fond of Rome, you know—gave him strength.†
on the contrary = an expression used to intensify denial of an idea
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 38
Web Links
cultivate
10 uses
Isabel wondered at her; she had never had so directly presented to her nose the white flower of cultivated sweetness.†
cultivated = developed, grown, or prepared for growing crops
DefinitionGenerally cultivate means:
enhance growth or development
in various senses, including:
  • to grow crops or prepare land for them
  • enhance a relationship — especially for a purpose
  • develop discernment (better recognition of differences) in taste or judgment
  • to grow a culture in a petri dish
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
deceive
13 uses
You can't deceive me any more; for God's sake be honest with a man who's so honest with you.†
deceive = lie or mislead
DefinitionGenerally deceive means:
to lie to or mislead someone — occasionally to lie to oneself by denying reality
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
duplicity
2 uses
It was true her aunt's complaint had been not so much of Madame Merle's activity as of her duplicity: she had brought about the strange event and then she had denied her guilt.
duplicity = deception
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 40
Web Links
grave
16 uses
But all the same I can't help feeling that you're running a grave risk.†
grave = serious and solemn
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book16 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 29
Web Links
illustrate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
as illustrated by this example
Pansy was already dressed; she was always in advance of the time: it seemed to illustrate her pretty patience and the graceful stillness with which she could sit and wait.†
illustrate = help make clear
DefinitionGenerally this sense of illustrate means:
to help make clear — typically by example
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 45
Web Links
inclined
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
I'm inclined to
Isabel now saw more of her than she had done since her marriage; but by this time Isabel's needs and inclinations had considerably changed.†
inclinations = tendencies (attitudes favoring)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of inclined means:
a tendency, mood, desire, or attitude that favors something; or making someone favor something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 40
Web Links
ingenious
11 uses
Her talk with him moreover pointed to presence of mind; it expressed a kindness so ingenious and deliberate as to indicate that she was in undisturbed possession of her faculties.†
ingenious = showing cleverness and originality
Word Statistics
Book11 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 40
Web Links
intellectual
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
intellectual stimulation
Intellectually, doubtless, she had made immense strides; but she appeared to have achieved few of those social conquests of which Mrs. Ludlow had expected to admire the trophies.†
intellectually = in a manner that relates to intelligence
DefinitionGenerally this sense of intellectual means:
related to intelligence — such as requiring, appealing to, or possessing intelligence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
irrelevant
5 uses
It was under the pressure of this control that she became, after a little, irrelevant.†
irrelevant = not relevant (not related to the subject being considered, or not important enough to want to consider)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 48
Web Links
moreover
12 uses
It belonged to the past, moreover; it had occurred six months before and she had already laid aside the tokens of mourning.†
moreover = in addition to what has just been said
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
obligation
9 uses
She had a great sense of beauty in all ways, and it involved a good many intellectual obligations.†
obligations = a duty
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 44
Web Links
precede
4 uses
Of course not: she must have meant something else—something which in the press of the hours that preceded her departure she had not had time to explain.†
preceded = went or was before
DefinitionGenerally precede means:
to go or do before
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
propriety
9 uses
"We should have been glad to see you at any time," Osmond observed with propriety.†
propriety = socially correct or appropriate behavior
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 36
Web Links
superficial
7 uses
—which perhaps was exactly why Ralph had made his old-time look of superficial sociability a reproach to him.†
superficial = relating to a surface rather than to anything deep or penetrating
DefinitionGenerally superficial means:
relating to a surface rather than to anything deep or penetrating (often of injuries or thinking)
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 42
Web Links
vulgar
15 uses
What cared Isabel Archer for the vulgar judgments of obscure people?
vulgar = unsophisticated
DefinitionGenerally vulgar means:
of bad taste — often crude or offensive

or:

unsophisticated (or common) — especially of taste
Word Statistics
Book15 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 42
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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